monoamine oxidase inhibitor


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Related to monoamine oxidase inhibitor: SSRI, Selegiline, monoamine oxidase inhibitor diet

monoamine oxidase inhibitor

[män·ō′am‚ēn ′äk·sə‚dās in′hib·əd·ər]
(pharmacology)
Any drug, such as isocarboxazid and tranylcypromine, that inhibits monoamine oxidase and thereby leads to an accumulation of the amines on which the enzyme normally acts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 Recommended dosages of monoamine oxidase inhibitors Medication Starting dosages Usual therapeutic_dosage Selegiline transdermal 10 mg twice a day 30 to 60 mg/d Tranykyprornine 15 mg twice a day 45 to 90mg/d Isocarboxazid 6 mg patch/d 6 to 12 mg patch/d Pheneizine 10 mg, 2 or 3 30 to 60 mg/d times a day Source: Adapted from reference 8
These include newer medications-chiefly the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)-the tricyclics, and the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs).
Other medications that have been cited in studies include cyclobenzaprine for musculoskeletal complaints, monoamine oxidase inhibitors for patients with atypical depression and over-the-counter analgesics such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen for flu-like symptoms and muscle aches (Kantrowitz et al.
Lofepramine should not be administered at the same time as or within two weeks of stopping treatment with monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
Modern standard prescription antidepressant medications traditionally fall into three classes: heterocyclic antidepressants (HCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), and lithium salts.
Known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), this radically new class of drugs offers distinct advantages over the older tricyclics, heterocyclics, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
Among the wide range of medications that may affect sexual functions are diuretics (water pills), antihypertensives (blood-pressure medicine), antiarrhythmics (for irregular heart-beat), antihistamines (for allergies), antiandrogens (for certain cancers), anticholinergics, ulcer medications, cancer drugs, central nervous system depressants, sedatives, hypnotics, antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, antipsychotics, and alcohol.
These include two classes of antidepressants -- tricyclics and monoamine oxidase inhibitors -- and three tranquilizers classed as benzodiazepines.
Despite an abundance of evidenced-based literature supporting monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) as an effective treatment for depression, use of these agents has decreased drastically in the past 3 decades.
Tipton, "The therapeutic potential of monoamine oxidase inhibitors," Nature Reviews Neuroscience, vol.
I recommend starting with the monoamine oxidase inhibitors and going down the list until you get to the L-dopa," Dr.
The relevant PIs have been updated with information on mania/hypomania, use with monoamine oxidase inhibitors, serotonin syndrome, akathisia, recommendations to undertake glycaemic monitoring.