monoamine

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monoamine

[¦män·ō′am‚ēn]
(organic chemistry)
An amine compound that has only one amino group.
References in periodicals archive ?
First used clinically in the 1950s to treat tuberculosis, MAOIs have a long and interesting history (see the Box "Abrief history of monoamine oxidase inhibitors" on CurrentPsychiatry.
Monoamines levelsafter pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in hippocampus and frontal cortex of Wistar rats.
MAO is associated with mitochondria and is the enzyme responsible for breaking down monoamines in the presynaptic terminal of neurons, reducing their availability for neurotransmission.
The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of VW root extract on sleep pattern by recording sleep-wake profile, electroencephalogram (EEG) delta activity during sleep and estimation of regional brain monoamines.
Major Finding: Scans revealed 43% more monoamine oxidase across all brain regions in women during postpartum days 4-6, compared with those in controls.
Using positron emission tomography (PET) - an imaging method that creates images of the distribution of a short-lived radioactive substance in an organism - the researchers measured the distribution of a radioactively- marked ligand in the brain which binds specifically and with a high affinity to the enzyme monoamine oxidase A.
Peripheral measurements of monoamine neurotransmitters (serotonin and the catecholamines, dopamine and norepinephrine) and their metabolites in either plasma or urine have been used most often to look at mechanisms in hypotension or hypertension, and as screening procedures to detect and monitor neuroblastoma and pheochromocytoma (1-3).
6 hr, and 95% of the ATR administered is excreted within 7 days of dosing, whereas changes in monoamines and numbers of neurons were measured 2 weeks posttreatment.
Despite the replacement of the monoamine hypothesis of depression with a more comprehensive understanding of multiple influencing factors in the pathology of depression, it is clear that elevating monoamines does result in an elevation in mood in many depressed individuals.
Evaluation of toluene exposure via drinking water on levels of regional brain biogenic monoamines and their metabolite in CD-1 mice.
Furthermore, review articles tell of rats trained to run spontaneously that showed an increase both in beta-endorphin and in monoamine concentration in their cerebrospinal fluid (1, 9).
I approach this question through an in-depth analysis of a typical experiment for clinical depression involving the monoamine hypothesis, drug action, and placebos.