monochrome

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monochrome

1. a black-and-white photograph or transparency
2. Photog black and white
3. 
a. a painting, drawing, etc., done in a range of tones of a single colour
b. the technique or art of this
4. executed in or resembling monochrome

Monochrome

 

literally, of a single color. The term is often used in reference to works of art executed in a single color or various tones of that color. An example is a grisaille.

monochrome

[′män·ə‚krōm]
(optics)
Having only one chromaticity.

monochrome

(graphics)
Literally "one colour". Usually used for a black and white (or sometimes green or orange) monitor as distinct from a color monitor. Normally, each pixel on the display will correspond to a single bit of display memory and will therefore be one of two intensities. A grey-scale display requires several bits per pixel but might still be called monochrome.

Compare: bitonal.

monochrome

Also called "mono." Refers to display screens that use one foreground and one background color; for example, black on white, white on black or green on black. The first terminals connected to mainframes and minicomputers were monochrome, and monochrome screens were widely used on early personal computers.

Monochrome Vs. Grayscale
Quite often, a non-color monitor is called monochrome; however, if it displays shades of the single color, then it is a grayscale monitor. See pixel and color depth.


References in periodicals archive ?
But the "Fire Paintings" were disappointing, as were the "Cosmogonies," in that they looked like the Informel, tachist works of the so-called Jeune Ecole de Paris that Klein had sought to debunk from the outset with his monochromes.
On the strength of that exhibition, I consider Marioni to be one of the foremost painters at work anywhere at the present, and the great and thought-provoking surprise his art has given me is not only that it transcends the previous limitations of the monochrome but also that it is the first body of work I have seen that suggests that the Minimalist intervention may have had productive consequences for painting of the highest ambition.
This show of ten ultramarine monochromes, virtually identical in size (roughly 30 by 22 inches) and in their lightly textured facture (made with a housepainter's roller), was a sensuous, literal, explicit challenge to the ideology of art informel painting.
The room of paintings made do with five approximately 30-by-22-inch blue monochromes, several later in date than 1957, and they were not hung forward from the wall.
These works, interpretations or articulations or deformations of the monochromes, "illustrate" Klein's imageless paintings, explicating formal characteristics and ideas that might not have been obvious to his audience from the monochrome panels alone.
In 1957, in a notorious exhibition in Milan's Galleria Apollinaire, Klein exhibited 11 monochrome blue paintings, noticeably different only in their surface texture and, also, in their prices.
Duchamp's rotoreliefs, Jean Dubuffet's eponges, Man Ray's rayo-grams, Ellsworth Kelly's monochrome paintings, Robert Rauschenberg's blueprints from 1949-51, all resurface in Klein's opus, covered in a homogenizing layer of IKB, and with an average delay of about ten years.
What is lacking in the semiotician's account of painting is the possibility that there might be a painting--a monochrome by Olivier Mosset, for example--that isn't a monochrome in any conventional sense.