Monody

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monody

1. (in Greek tragedy) an ode sung by a single actor
2. any poem of lament for someone's death
3. Music a style of composition consisting of a single vocal part, usually with accompaniment

Monody

 

in ancient Greece, solo singing to the accompaniment of an aulos, cithara, or lyre. The term also denotes a style of solo singing with homophonic accompaniment that originated in Italy in the 16th century and gave rise to such new forms and genres as aria, recitative, opera, and cantata. In a broader sense, “monody” designates any vocal music for a single melodic line (solo, ensemble, or choral in unison or octave) or the vocal part of a composition performed with instrumental accompaniment.


Monody

 

a musical texture consisting of a single melody performed by a singer or an instrumentalist, and frequently by two or more performers (in unison or an octave apart). It differs from polyphonic texture in that no harmonies (simultaneous combinations of nonparallel sounds) are formed. Monody is the only texture found in the folk music of many peoples. The concept of monody is narrower than that of melody, which also includes melodies, a concept that is inconceivable without accompaniment. Nonetheless, “monody” sometimes refers to a solo song with instrumental accompaniment.

References in periodicals archive ?
From this polyphony, Hill extracts monodic versions in which he examines the "effect of written-out sprezzatura di canto" (1:100) and rhetorical figures.
The problem is that it is difficult to determine whether a polyphonic version was modeled on a monodic version, or vice versa.
Recalling the Debussy of the archaic more than of the Iberian, Ohana's melodic lines parody the contour of plainchant, sometimes monodic, sometimes thickened with organum-like parallelism.
According to Bukofzer, Quagliati's "unique, though hardly successful" effort was doomed by its hybrid nature, causing these pieces to lose "the concertato texture of the parts without gaining the flexibility of the monodic style" (Music in the Baroque Era [New York: W.
By making them also available in monodic versions, he enhanced their usefulness "since it is not always possible to find four good voices at the ready.
Eight lines (1, 2, 3, 7, 10, 11, 12, and 14) are set polyphonically, five (4, 5, 8, 9, and 13) are monodic, and one (6) is set twice with two sections of different music, one monodic and one polyphonic.
Quagliati's solo sections sound much like the Cento concerti ecclesiastici (1602) of Lodovico Grossi da Viadana, another composer often chided for the basic conservatism of his monodic practice.
The monodic material is usually radically reworked, and thus ultimately shows itself as retrospective, not (as Bukofzer's criticism might imply) forwardlooking.
Similarly, the section "Bulla fulminante" of Dic Christi is cum littera, so according to fundamentalist theory it should be sung without rhythm; so, too, with the monodic Veste nuptiali, found elsewhere, to the same tune.