Monody

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monody

1. (in Greek tragedy) an ode sung by a single actor
2. any poem of lament for someone's death
3. Music a style of composition consisting of a single vocal part, usually with accompaniment

Monody

 

in ancient Greece, solo singing to the accompaniment of an aulos, cithara, or lyre. The term also denotes a style of solo singing with homophonic accompaniment that originated in Italy in the 16th century and gave rise to such new forms and genres as aria, recitative, opera, and cantata. In a broader sense, “monody” designates any vocal music for a single melodic line (solo, ensemble, or choral in unison or octave) or the vocal part of a composition performed with instrumental accompaniment.


Monody

 

a musical texture consisting of a single melody performed by a singer or an instrumentalist, and frequently by two or more performers (in unison or an octave apart). It differs from polyphonic texture in that no harmonies (simultaneous combinations of nonparallel sounds) are formed. Monody is the only texture found in the folk music of many peoples. The concept of monody is narrower than that of melody, which also includes melodies, a concept that is inconceivable without accompaniment. Nonetheless, “monody” sometimes refers to a solo song with instrumental accompaniment.

References in periodicals archive ?
Encompassing nearly four decades of this significant composer's career, these monodies chart his own development whilst never demanding outrageous, anti-instrument distortions from his performers.
But the sacred monodies, like the duets and trios that follow them, also speak in ways that would have been relatively unfamiliar to the elder Lasso, for they make regular use of basso continuo, florid vocal writing (often in cascades of parallel intervals), and theatrical contrasts in which sections of' a text are fragmented, sequentially repeated, and even recapitulated over the course of an individual work.
Some of the traditions explored are rasgueado guitar accompaniments, improvisatory vocal ornamentation in strophic settings, and the practice of creating monodies from polyphonic music.
The nine prints of monodies by Ottavio Durante, Antonio Cifra, Paolo Quagliati, and Andrea Falconieri known to have been in the Montalto family library in the seventeenth century are also problematic.