Monogenism

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Monogenism

 

the doctrine in anthropology which asserts that mankind has a single origin and that all the human races are related to one another by blood kinship.

According to monogenism, contemporary mankind has one species (Homo sapiens), and the human races are intraspecific subdivisions that formed as a result of modern man’s settling in various areas of the world. Monogenism is confirmed by a multitude of anthropological facts and above all by the fact that all the human races yield fertile offspring when mixed.

References in periodicals archive ?
Darwin's thinking also contradicted the core claim of the monogenists.
A somewhat active participant was the Christian monogenist, a onetime physician turned army interpreter and modern Oriental language instructor in Marseille, Eusebe de Salle (also written de Salles).
A former secretary of the Societe de geographie, the Africanist Marie-Armand-Pascal d'Avezac, was a hierarchical monogenist.
The hierarchical monogenist naturalists used the supposed objectivity of science to question the necessity of Biblical monogenism.
On the monogenist side were the ex-physician to the viceroy of Egypt and ally of Quatrefages, Franz Pruner-Bey, the former Martinique physician Etienne Rufz de Lavison, and the alienist Louis-Jean Delasiauve.
Quatrefages may have been a monogenist charitable to "savages" and to increased educational potential of non-Europeans.
The shift in the predominance of the polygenists and the monogenists during the nineteenth century, for example, was not a revolutionary one and did not constitute a "paradigm shift.
Their issues were the fertility of hybrid species in zoology, the accuracy of Genesis, and the sources of African inferiority, which both monogenists and polygenists assumed.
Monogenists and polygenists cited the example of the Jews in proof or refutation of ideological positions on the innate or environmental origins of race.