monopodial


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monopodial

[‚män·ə′pōd·ē·əl]
(botany)
Stem branching in which there are lateral shoots on a primary axis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The earliest unequivocal sphenopsid that has been discovered is Pseudobornia ursina, a monopodial arborescent clonal plant of the upper Devonian which grew up to 20 m tall with stems up to 60 cm in diameter (Scagel et al.
A perusal of the (Table-1) indicates that the lines did not differ in respect of number of monopodial branches per plant.
Of Source Of Yield Per Plant Monopodial Sympodial Variation Plant Height Branches Branches Replication 224.
Current interpretations indicate that angiosperms as a whole are ancestrally sympodial, a growth form that is very frequently associated with adventitious roots, and that taproots and monopodial structures are probably apomorphies within angiosperms (Carlquist, 2009).
The prostrate sympodial habit common in most monocot clades has the advantage of being able to spread laterally over territory, whereas a monopodial eudicot is limited to a narrowly limited piece of ground.
The differences between sympodial systems with adventitious roots and monopodial systems with taproots are profound.
Spikelet structure and development in Cyperoideae (Cyperaceae): a monopodial general model based on ontogenetic evidence.
There have been long-standing discussions about the monopodial or sympodial construction of the spikelet.
Bower later (1916) in a more important paper confirms and elaborates on the views of earlier writers that the leaf of the ferns and other primitive vascular plants is fundamentally dichotomous in organization, and that the monopodial pinnate leaf is derived from dichotomy through a sympodial stage.
Thus the shoot and its appendages, the leaves, became differentiated through equal dichotomy to a sympodial and finally to a monopodial system (Fig.
These are: pseudomonopodial or monopodial branching; a basically helical arrangement of branches; small, "pinnulelike" vegetative branches (non-planate in basal taxa); recurvation of branch apices; sporangia in pairs grouped into terminal trusses; and multicellular appendages (spines).