monstrous

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monstrous

(of plants and animals) abnormal in structure
References in periodicals archive ?
Shelley's monster then coexists with Boris Karloff's (and Elsa Lancaster's), generating comparisons and discussions of monstrousness without theory.
By August 2005 the monstrousness of such accusations, which might otherwise have suggested only that poor Mrs.
He's playing a maverick visionary who is undone by the monstrousness of his own ambition.
An awkward metaphor introduced too abruptly to be effective, it nevertheless conveys the message that, after a confrontation with his own monstrousness, Frank is now able to enjoy a feeling of belonging.
But because of her knowledge of the dance world and Robbins's pivotal yet peculiar place in it, she's able to present him in all his glory and monstrousness with cool precision.
These sycamore bodies suggest a dangerous monstrousness, an unimaginable other, a "lesbian body not only an extension of the female body but also at times a silent, potentially frightening figure behind that body" (Farwell 158).
Jabotinsky did not foresee the Holocaust in its terrible monstrousness.
On the one hand, spectators are confronted with Bateman's monstrousness, but on the other, they become Bateman's confidants, narratees, and this is why Bateman is both a fascinating and a disgusting character.
Amis reports that he read "yards" of books about Stalin to write Koba the Dread: Laughter and the Twenty Million (Miramax), a meditation on the monstrousness of Stalin and the consequent historical vulnerability of a left that has never fully dealt with its past complicity in mass murder.
in the course of modernizing themselves somehow went off the track and ended up in some other place, where they routinely committed acts of inexplicable monstrousness.
A sense of monstrousness, rather, is being deliberately suggested.
In the former, crime is characterized as a regrettable, but manageable, instance of everyday life, while in the latter it is regarded as "a product of personal and social monstrousness requiring punitive state intervention" (O'Malley, 1999: 181).