mood disorder

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Related to Mood disorders: Anxiety disorders, Personality disorders

mood disorder

[′müd dis‚ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Goldberg spent many years conducting studies of mood disorders at academic medical centers such as the Payne Whitney Clinic/Weill Medical College of New York Presbyterian Hospital, the Zucker Hillside Hospital-North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
Multiple studies have reported loss of myelin integrity in psychotic and mood disorders.
Lead researcher Dr Anika Knuppel, from University College London's Institute of Epidemiology and Health, said: "High sugar diets have a number of influences on our health but our study shows that there might also be a link between sugar and mood disorders, particularly among men.
Patients taking water tablets for high blood pressure had the same risk of mood disorders as people not on any drugs.
We are pleased the behavioral data gathered via our mobile application and analyzed via our behavior models will help medical professionals gain insights into the course and relapse patterns of these major mood disorders, and patients will gain a better understanding of their own health.
Youth with mood disorders are not yet widely recognized as a group at increased risk for excessive and early heart disease.
Imaging offers investigators a "completely objective" measure of changes in brain function, and thus is an important tool in clinical trials for medications and treatments for mood disorders, Dr.
The mounting evidence that these conditions both fall on a spectrum of mood disorders could transform the way doctors and patients think about, diagnose, and treat them.
Thus, the current study was undertaken to explore the co-morbidity of OCD and other anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with mood disorders.
Treatment-resistant mood disorders pose a great socioeconomic and life-threatening burden on public health system.
Mood disorders were the most common diagnosis for Medicaid-insured hospitalizations not involving neonatal or maternal stays in 2012, according to a report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.