moonshine

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moonshine

1. another word for moonlight
2. US and Canadian illegally distilled or smuggled whisky or other spirit
References in periodicals archive ?
American Born Moonshine, was launched by Windy Hill Spirits, a Nashville-based company founded in 2012 by Dillingham and Koffel to bring a moonshine whiskey to consumers that would honor the incredible tradition of American moonshiners.
Artisanal moonshiners are quietly brewing small batches in homes throughout America.
The narrator, a Vietnam vet from a long line of moonshiners, comes home from the war and decides to get into the marijuana business.
The truth is that the latest energy legislation and the continued push for ethanol by the government-backed moonshiners have much less to do with reality and much more to do with politics.
In this category are two books on the Seminoles, several biographies, as well as Female Activists in Twentieth-Century Florida; Gladesmen: Gator Hunters, Moonshiners, and Skiffers; Florida's Farmworkers in the Twenty-first Century; Hitler's Soldiers in the Sunshine State; and The Invisible Empire: The Ku Klux Klan.
Just as the white moonshiners have taken over and destroyed the former plantation house, it is equally symbolic that Temple's scene of degradation occurs at the hands of the white bootlegger/gangster in a corncrib and with a corncob--the abject remains of the main ingredient in moonshine whiskey.
Because moonshiners are becoming increasingly sophisticated, the process of finding and destroying their operations can be a long and involved one.
The film's thin premise revolves around the many hurdles Briski faces in removing the kids from the brothels and their relatives, most of whom are either prostitutes, drug dealers or moonshiners.
The 1000-square mile forest has been a bolt-hole for moonshiners and local militiamen who have their own idea of law and order and a dim view of the Feds and "revenoooers" who try to inflict taxes upon them.
The tale of Big Mama itself reveals how, in the midst of change, Appalachian values of defiant independence hold their own--though, perhaps, in an ever more degraded form--exemplified by the moonshiners who merely change crops but remain outlaws, and by the name of the mountain where they live, "Standing Indian," which has lost any etymological connection to the indigenous Cherokee driven out on the Trail of Tears, but whose English name conjures the image of durability and defiance.
In the old days, moonshiners often used wood barrels for "thumper barrels," a process where the steam was allowed to partially condense and run back into the still in order to raise the "octane" of their product.
A still, used by moonshiners in the 1950s, was removed from the cave in 1958.