mooring line


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mooring line

[′mu̇r·iŋ ‚līn]
(naval architecture)
A rope or cable used for securing a ship to a pier or wharf.
References in periodicals archive ?
The formation of a non-linear deterministic model for coupled dynamic analysis includes the formulation of a non-linear stiffness matrix, allowing for mooring line tension fluctuations subjected to variable buoyancy, as well as structural and environmental non-linearities.
So crewman Les swam to the woman, becoming tangled in mooring lines himself and suffering cuts and bruises as he struggled to become free, before pulling her from the water on to the boat.
The mooring lines are chains that have been plunged
A hydrophone could listen for whale calls all right, but these hydrophones hung on a mooring line "that clanked and yanked," said John Kemp, head of at-sea operations for the WHOI Mooring Operations, Engineering, and Field Support Group.
Anchored to the seafloor 180 meters (590 feet) deep, the mooring line held a variety of instruments, including an experimental device called the Arctic Winch to obtain critical measurements in the top 50 meters (164 feet), where less-dense fresh water flows just below the ice.
Postscript: After arriving in Woods Hole, divers cleared the sundered mooring line from Oceanus's propeller.
The shared mooring system is designed to reduce the overall amount of mooring lines, share anchors and reduce costs.
Next on the mooring line comes the shallowest sediment trap.
The mooring instrumentation included a complete meteorological set on the buoy to observe the local atmosphere, and oceanographic sensors on the mooring line to monitor the salinity, temperature, and currents in the upper ocean.
The buoy carries the meteorological sensors, and the mooring line beneath it carries the oceanographic instrumentation.
Mooring line failure on board LNG carrier Zarga alongside at South Hook terminal, Milford Haven resulting in serious injury to deck officer.
The polypropylene or nylon mooring line between the buoy and the anchor supported current meters at variable intervals from the near surface to the bottom.