moral entrepreneurs

moral entrepreneurs

those members of society with the power to create or enforce rules (BECKER, Outsiders: Studies in the Sociology of Deviance, 1963). For Becker, for whom DEVIANCE represents ‘publicly labelled wrongdoing’, someone must call the public's attention to such wrongdoings. Deviance is the product of enterprise in the sense that there are:
  1. those who act to get rules made; and
  2. those who apply the rules once a rule has come into existence, so that offenders created by the abstract rules may be identified, apprehended and convicted. Becker's interest is in reversing the emphasis of most social scientific research which concerns itself with the people who break rules. Instead, he suggests ‘we must see deviance… as a consequence of a process of interaction between people, some of whom, in the service of their own interests, make and enforce rules which catch others who, in the service of their own interests, have committed acts which are labelled deviant’. See also LABELLING THEORY, MORAL CRUSADE.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This stigmatization effort is usually led by moral entrepreneurs, for example international legal experts, religious leaders, or public intellectuals.
Moral entrepreneurs are activists who attempt to persuade others to adhere to a particular value system.
The most influential moral entrepreneurs for Arab youth who live in the MENA region and beyond are no longer preachers in the mosques.
Hafner-Burton's analysis aims to steal our eyes from the more conventional explanations of such developments--among them the notion that moral entrepreneurs, such as NGOs and activist citizens, have played the key, causal role in changing the face of global trade regulation.
Moral entrepreneurs and the campaign to ban landmines.
It is symbolic in terms of the outline of a principle, a shadow of control-to-come, and a compromised compromise between the three core groups--distantly interested, distracted government, core cadre of politically active and energetically noisy moral entrepreneurs, and economically anchored dealers eager to join the regulatory circus to defuse from the inside whatever explosive possibilities may be in store.
The new act regarding alcoholism (Act on Alcohol and Alcohol Related Problems) in force since 2001 has been the result of greater debate among various groups: economic entrepreneurs, health entrepreneurs, and moral entrepreneurs.
Cohen's research on deviance discussed this process of how the media and various moral entrepreneurs and government enforcers can conspire to create a panic.
In this process the role of moral agents or moral entrepreneurs is significant, but it should be stressed that people do not simply 'pick up' any label that is thrown into public discourse.
Moral entrepreneurs have toiled tirelessly in attempting to persuade society that homosexuality is abnormal and immoral.
And Glaser has a nice dynamic model of moral-entrepreneurial vice creation, repression (with all the corrupting consequences) and eventual accommodation or partial toleration: things, it appears, are likely to get better as the strictures of the moral entrepreneurs are overwhelmed by the common sense of the citizenry seeing what the consequences of drugs prohibition are.
Nadelmann (1990) has called this dimension "moral proselytizing" and the individuals who carry it out "transnational moral entrepreneurs.