moralist

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moralist

1. a person who seeks to regulate the morals of others or to imbue others with a sense of morality
2. a person who lives in accordance with moral principles
3. a philosopher who is concerned with casuistic discussions of right action, or who seeks a general characterization of right action, often contrasted with a moral philosopher whose concern is with general philosophical questions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
tentativeness, change, ecumenism, universality, exploration, moralistic interpretation, religious angst, complexity, and existential motives).
Youth and parents are correct if they think that Moralistic Therapeutic Deism will outfit them better for success in American society than Christianity will"--at least over the short term.
Initial content also includes articles on: material witness detention in the 19th Century; arguments against moralistic legislation; litigating under the rational bias test; and, a defense of the Electoral College.
Better the children of such families, if they have to face adoption or fostering, are taken in by loving, caring people than they are automatically farmed-out according to moralistic notions.
Children, teens and adults who enjoy moralistic stories with a humorous tone will cherish this work.
To those in the audience who are not worried parents, it provides both sexual and moralistic thrills; it plays both to the prurient fascination with teenage girls gone wild and to the paternalistic stereotype of girls as victims.
Like Bryan himself, his devoted followers (upon whose correspondence with Will and Mary Bryan Kazin draws heavily) were characterized by a highly moralistic and Bible-inflected approach to politics and a very direct and practical approach to the implications of their faith.
More immediately appealing are Snyder's lighter and less moralistic works.
Kammen appears to accept the shared concern of moralistic naturalists and alienated urbanites about the loss of seasonal awareness as the only American perspective on seasonal changes and their significance.
Moralistic political cultures are grounded in the view that politics are the instrument by which people use government to build the "good society.
Through three novels and six volumes of short stories, Cooper has been telling these tales in a voice that is shoot-from-the-hip direct, moralistic, cautionary yet always compassionate.
This observation pinpoints the value of the author's undertaking, for not only had the story of the eighteenth-century moral tale hitherto not been told, but the history of moralistic writing in the eighteenth century, of which this is one fascinating aspect, remains to be written.