moral

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moral

Law (of evidence, etc.) based on a knowledge of the tendencies of human nature

MORAL

Mentioned in "An Overview of Ada", J.G.P. Barnes, Soft Prac & Exp 10:851-887 (1980).
References in classic literature ?
This being, made only for happiness, and heretofore so miserably failing to be happy,--his tendencies so hideously thwarted, that, some unknown time ago, the delicate springs of his character, never morally or intellectually strong, had given way, and he was now imbecile,--this poor, forlorn voyager from the Islands of the Blest, in a frail bark, on a tempestuous sea, had been flung, by the last mountain-wave of his shipwreck, into a quiet harbor.
I never had naething to do with onything morally wrong; and I'm no gaun to begin to pleasure a wild Hielandman.
But the doctor had been morally (if not legally) taken into her confidence--and, for that reason, he decided that he had a right in this serious matter to satisfy his own mind.
There is a limit, morally as well as physically, to our capacity for endurance.
Legally speaking, as well as morally speaking, it absolutely vindicates your husband's innocence.
Miss Stacy was a bright, sympathetic young woman with the happy gift of winning and holding the affections of her pupils and bringing out the best that was in them mentally and morally.
I am morally certain that she is with her sister at Howards End.
She took of her hat, and, morally speaking, tucked up her sleeves and prepared for action.
However, it is again Greenawalt who has failed to capture people's intuitions, specifically the intuition that part of respecting a person is respecting her consent over the operation of her morally justified legal rights (within the type of limit Lyons identifies).
Morally Bankrupt Volume II: Pain Remover by Taham Acey NRGOD, 2001, $15.
What are stem cells exactly, and why do many people find their use morally troubling?
In the 1870s, reformers in both places sought to transform societies shaped by gold mining, large-scale monocropping, and pastoralism into egalitarian societies based on small-scale agriculture and morally cleansing garden landscapes.