mordant

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mordant

(môr`dənt) [Fr.,=biting], substance used in dyeing to fix certain dyes (mordant dyes) in cloth. Either the mordant (if it is colloidal) or a colloid produced by the mordant adheres to the fiber, attracting and fixing the colloidal mordant dye (see colloidcolloid
[Gr.,=gluelike], a mixture in which one substance is divided into minute particles (called colloidal particles) and dispersed throughout a second substance. The mixture is also called a colloidal system, colloidal solution, or colloidal dispersion.
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); the insoluble, colored precipitate that is formed is called a lakelake,
in dyeing, an insoluble pigment formed by the reaction between an organic dye and a mordant. The color of a lake depends upon the mordant as well as the dye used. Generally, lakes are not as colorfast as many inorganic dyes, but their colors are more brilliant.
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. The chemical compounds used as mordants are either acidic or basic. Acid mordants (e.g., tannic acid) are employed with basic dyes; basic mordants (e.g., alum, chrome alum, and certain salts of aluminum, chromium, copper, iron, potassium, and tin) are employed with acid dyes. Cloth to be dyed may be treated first with the mordant and then with the dye, or the mordant and dye may be applied together. The vividness of certain dyes that ordinarily do not require the use of a mordant may be markedly increased when one is employed.

mordant

[′mȯrd·ənt]
(chemistry)
An agent, such as alum, phenol, or aniline, that fixes dyes to tissues, cells, textiles, and other materials by combining with the dye to form an insoluble compound. Also known as dye mordant.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is why in "New Year's Eve" Elia mordantly quips, "I have almost ceased to hope; and am sanguine only in the prospects of other (former) years.
In this prequel to "Silence" and "Hannibal," Lecter plays more of a consultive role, aiding (for his own reasons) the FBI agent who captured him and is now in pursuit of Francis Dolarhyde, mordantly nicknamed "The Tooth Fairy.
He's mordantly frank about the consequences at Berkeley, where he arrived just when Proposition 209 abolished affirmative action, driving cocooned blacks and morally insecure whites into howls of outrage, prophecies of doom--and necessary, if wrenching, adjustments.
Foray calls the original series, which ran from 1959 to 1964, ``one of the most sophisticated, mordantly witty series that's ever been on the air.
Firmino also dreams a dream, of Paris, which echoes Sciascia's mordantly ironic denunciation, from his own dystopian location, of all Utopianisms, including those of blithe de-politicization and erotic fulfillment--Candido, ovvero Un sogno fatto in Sicilia: the difference is that Firmino aspires to enact it.
Granting similarities more apparent than real between Glynn and Pascal, Oakes adds mordantly, "we must be content with the apologists our age deserves.
Now, at the phenomenal age of 101, Chaudhuri has published a kind of coda to these books, a prophetic and mordantly aphoristic essay on contemporary decadence.
One of his oft-told stories mordantly conveyed the bitterness he felt about Galicia or "Europe," as he called it.
Quite apart from the bishop of Rome, the acclaimed atheist-leftist intellectual Sidney Hook might have best summed up the catastrophe when he referred to World War I not as the "Great War,'' or "War to End All Wars,'' or the "Kaiser's War,'' or, in President Woodrow Wilson's famous line, the war to "make the world safe for democracy,'' but as something considerably less inspiring: World War I was, said Hook mordantly, "the second fall of man.
An essay as much as an exhibition, "Blues for Smoke" was noisy (the warehouse space of the Geffen Contemporary was haunted by an Albert Ayler-inspired squall in Stan Douglas's terrific Hors-champs, 1992), mournful (a gallery of Mark Morrisroe's photos), mordantly funny (Dave McKenzie's Yesterday's Newspaper, 2012-13: Glenn Ligon's Richard Pryor paintings), practically indigestible (sixty episodes of HBO's The Wire), and nothing if not provocative.
The novel] takes on big subjects--race, class, money, religion, friendship, family, violence--by embedding them in irresistible storytelling about a compelling, conflicted and mordantly funny man.
Their strange unvarying tone, tinged with regret and nostalgia, a longing for something never found, or found briefly and then lost, a tone which from one poem to another could turn mordantly ironic, held me when I first read them in what seemed an almost hypnotic power, which still effortlessly draws me into them.