mores


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mores

(môr`āz), concept developed by William Graham SumnerSumner, William Graham,
1840–1910, American sociologist and political economist, b. Paterson, N.J., grad. Yale, 1863, and studied in Germany, in Switzerland, and at Oxford.
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 to designate those folkwaysfolkways,
term coined by William Graham Sumner in his treatise Folkways (1906) to denote those group habits that are common to a society or culture and are usually called customs.
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 that if violated, result in extreme punishment. The term comes from the Latin mos (customs), and although mores are fewer in number than folkways, they are more coercive. Negative mores are taboos, usually supported by religious or philosophical sanctions. Whereas folkways guide human conduct in the more mundane areas of life, mores tend to control those aspects connected with sex, the family, or religion.

mores

the accepted and strongly prescribed forms of behaviour within any society or community (W. G. Sumner, 1906). Mores are contrasted by SUMNER with FOLKWAYS in that the latter, though socially sanctioned, are less fundamental, less abstract in organization, and whose transgressions are less severely punished than those of mores.

mores

[′mȯr‚āz]
(ecology)
Groups of organisms preferring the same physical environment and having the same reproductive season.
References in periodicals archive ?
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