morganatic


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morganatic

of or designating a marriage between a person of high rank and a person of low rank, by which the latter is not elevated to the higher rank and any issue have no rights to the succession of the higher party's titles, property, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of assent to a morganatic marriage by the Canadian parliament or any other Commonwealth parliament would have no legal effect.
Cartoonists had a field day depicting the grossly overweight prince with his fat mistresses (it was Maria Fitzherbert, his morganatic wife, who was the first woman to be described as "fair, fat and forty"), but those who wished to criticize his sexual excesses bad to be careful.
We see Wootton Hall where Maria Fitzherbert lived with Prince George after a morganatic marriage.
Quoted in Lesley Hall, "'The English have hot water bottles': The morganatic marriage between sexology and medicine in Britain since William Acton," in Roy Porter and Mikulas Teich (eds), Sexual Knowledge, Sexual Science: The History of Attitudes to Sexuality (Cambridge, 1994), 353.
The king wanted a compromise, a morganatic marriage meaning that Wallis would not become Queen.
de Maintenon, the powerful morganatic wife of the Sun King, Louis XIV.
The other option, in their view, is a morganatic marriage, which would debar Camilla from any right to share Charles's title.
He was born during the gloomy and despotic last years of Louis XIV, when the king was dominated by his pietistical morganatic wife Mme de Maintenon, and cared only for the laborious grandiosity of Versailles and Marly.
Indeed, it would be possible to conjecture from Louis XIV's morganatic marriage to Madame de Maintenon, kept a secret, that Louis XIV is himself at the heart of the problem: he features as a sort of Barbe-bleue by his own serial conquest of women and wedding of wives.
In it he speaks of his love for Mrs Simpson and hints at the possibility of a morganatic marriage whereby she would not have been Queen.
117) This admittedly "elusive and subtle" cluster of popular attitudes, Friedman insists, should be subjected to careful examination rather than Morganatic invective, but it can also be distinguished from those legal doctrines and practices that either encourage or restrain the effective assertion of rights.
Charles and Camilla will enter into a morganatic marriage.