Momotidae

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Momotidae

[mə′mäd·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The motmots, a family of colorful New World birds in the order Coraciiformes.

Momotidae

 

(motmots), a family of birds of the order Coraciiformes. Body length, 17–47 cm. The edges of the bill are serrated. The tail is graduated; the shafts of the middle rectrices are bare at the top (the birds pluck the feathers themselves). The plumage is green, with light blue, black, and red spots. There are eight species, distributed in the tropical forests of Central and South America. Motmots nest in burrows (up to 1.8 m deep) dug in cliffs or level ground. There are three or four eggs in a clutch; both parents incubate for 21 or 22 days. The young leave the nest in 28 to 31 days. Motmots feed on insects and fruits.

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The Tody Motmot has not been recorded performing movements or migrations of any kind (Snow 2001).
Lane, Patrick O'Donnel, Scott Olmstead, and Jay VanderGaast assisted in identification of Tody Motmot vocalizations.
1996), and further study is needed to assess the conservation value of foothill forests on the Caribbean Slope of the Tilaran Mountains and populations of Tody Motmots within these forests.
Tail-racket removal increases hematocrit in male Turquoise-browed Motmots (Eumomota superciliosa).
We report opportunistic observations of a single Blue-crowned Motmot nocturnally foraging on aerial insects in the vicinity of an electric street lamp at Coopecabanas, San Jose, Costa Rica (09[degrees] 55' N, 84[degrees] 12' W; 910 m elevation).
However, the large size of prey may compensate, as we observed the motmot did not need many feeding events to be apparently satiated as it left the scene.
Blue-crowned Motmot (Momotus momota) predation on a long-tongued bat (Glossophaginae).
Life history of the Broad-billed Motmot with notes on the Rufous Motmot.
and Zahawi 2006) to the known diets for even well-studied species, such as motmots (Skutch 1945, 1947, 1964, 1971; Orejuela 1980; Remsen et al.
The Blue-crowned Motmot (Momotus momota), found throughout the lowlands and middle elevations (to ~1,500 m) of Costa Rica (Stiles and Skutch 1989), forages on large spiders, earthworms, insects, nestling birds, and small snakes and lizards (Stiles and Skutch 1989, Henderson 2002).
The motmot held the hummingbird by its body and repeatedly beat it against the cement.
motmots, kingfishers) were excluded since few other species adopt their cavities.