motor neuron


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motor neuron

[′mōd·ər ′nu̇r‚än]
(neuroscience)
An efferent nerve cell. Also known as motoneuron.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, they focused on the approximately 50 motor neurons that control movement of each of six legs.
We suspected that, the rats have strong self-repair ability and quick recovering from cerebral infarction, although there was decrease in motor neurons due to transsynaptic degeneration in pathological studies at the later stage, the denervated muscle fibers of those motor neuron may be reinnervated by the survived motor neurons, which may lead to the increase in CMAP amplitude and MUNE.
8,9) Clinically cerebellar ataxia with pure motor neuron disase suggests the possibility if ALS Plus syndrome especially ubiquitinated forms of TDP-43 and ubiquitinated p62-positive inclusions were frequently observed.
They showed that the transplanted stem cell-derived motor neurons grew along the injured nerves to connect successfully with the paralyzed muscles, which could then be controlled by pulses of blue light.
Ultimately required for diagnosis are signs and symptoms of both upper and lower motor neuron involvement attributable to no other causes.
Additional studies also showed that NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative products also damaged proteins including insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors located on motor neurons.
These columns form in the initial phases of motor neuron organization, which determines whether motor neurons grow to the limbs or to other targets.
ALS is a progressive and fatal neurological disease characterized by a degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem and cerebral cortex, leading to muscle wasting and weakness.
He was then noted to have a complete left lower motor neuron facial palsy and a loss of sensation to touch and pain over the mandibular nerve distribution of the skin.
It was the eminent French neurologist Charcot who first described motor neuron disease (MND) in 1874 (Swash, 2000).
Subjects covered include: epidemiology, patholophysiology, and surgical management of SCI; clinical and functional evaluation; initial rehabilitation medicine consultation; bladder and bowel management; pressure ulcers; contracture management; autonomic dysfunction; upper motor neuron syndrome; heterotropic ossificans; psychological adaptation; sexuality; aging; wheelchair mobility; environmental modifications; and community reintegration.
Upper motor neuron damage results in weakness, muscle stiffness (spasticity) and exaggerated reflexes.