motto


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motto

1. a short explanatory phrase inscribed on or attached to something
2. a verse or maxim contained in a paper cracker
3. a quotation prefacing a book or chapter of a book
4. a recurring musical phrase
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress adopted "In God We Trust" as the national motto in 1956.
I have been making wine in Washington for my entire career so I came into the Motto wines with no preconceived notions or ideas of how California wines should be made," continued Klei.
But that phrase didn't become the state motto until 1945, and it wasn't a state founder who came up with it.
They instead backed the city's non-sectarian motto, "Bringing People Together.
The Motto Rheuma Plaster was the winner of inventions at the 1992 Brussels World's Fair.
Ich dien is German for I serve and OM Edwards was referring to the English Prince of Wales who was, by then, using this badge and motto as an official heraldic badge.
The downside of the whole situation is that the TV channel that was most adamantly in favour of Sue motto notices may not be happy with the first sue motto of the new Chief Justice, as it is this channel that was able to exclusively broadcast the Full Court Reference.
Displaying the motto has a chilling effect on nonbelievers, she added.
Bazinet was referring to the then-present town motto, "Dudley, a Special Place.
House of Representatives decided to reaffirm the use of "In God We Trust" as the national motto and encourage its display in public schools and other public buildings.
LANCASTER -- Sparking the latest debate about religion and government, the Lancaster City Council has unanimously approved placing the motto "In God We Trust" on the back wall of the council chambers.