mould


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Related to mould: Black mould

mould

1 (US), mold
1. a shaped cavity used to give a definite form to fluid or plastic material
2. something shaped in or made on a mould

mould

2 (US), mold
1. a coating or discoloration caused by various saprotrophic fungi that develop in a damp atmosphere on the surface of stored food, fabrics, wallpaper, etc.
2. any of the fungi that causes this growth

mould

(US), mold
loose soil, esp when rich in organic matter

mold, mould

mold for finishing concrete
1. A concave and/or convex form from which castings or pressings are replicated.
2. A template or pattern. 3. Same as molding.

mould, moulding

British variants of mold, molding.
References in classic literature ?
I would not have every man nor every part of a man cultivated, any more than I would have every acre of earth cultivated: part will be tillage, but the greater part will be meadow and forest, not only serving an immediate use, but preparing a mould against a distant future, by the annual decay of the vegetation which it supports.
But is it necessary to suppose that these expressions are absolutely irreconcilable to each other; that no ALTERATIONS or PROVISIONS in the articles of the confederation could possibly mould them into a national and adequate government; into such a government as has been proposed by the convention?
When he breakfasted or dined all the resources of the club--its kitchens and pantries, its buttery and dairy--aided to crowd his table with their most succulent stores; he was served by the gravest waiters, in dress coats, and shoes with swan-skin soles, who proffered the viands in special porcelain, and on the finest linen; club decanters, of a lost mould, contained his sherry, his port, and his cinnamon-spiced claret; while his beverages were refreshingly cooled with ice, brought at great cost from the American lakes.
The window had been burst in by a mass of garden mould, which flowed over the table upon which we had been sitting and lay about our feet.
In the one case a man can take the mould of any character; in the other, he is lifted out of his proper self.
And in examining their actions and lives one cannot see that they owed anything to fortune beyond opportunity, which brought them the material to mould into the form which seemed best to them.