mountebank

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Related to mountebanks: charlatanry, charlatanism

mountebank

(formerly) a person who sold quack medicines in public places
References in periodicals archive ?
These were all marginal people - wanderers and mountebanks whose normal stock in trade was deformity, perversion, and sexual titillation.
Poor mountebanks, wider than they were tall, more dead than alive; poor clowns, their ghostlike faces emerging from piles of prison clothes
The documents illustrate the oratorical arcs of the mountebanks of the 1980s, but the humor that a reader may derive from some of the papers Kornbluh and Byrne have assembled must be tempered by a knowledge that the policy implications of such documents led to the deaths of more than 100,000 Central Americans and the destruction of tens of billions of dollars' worth of property.
The liveliest of the North American rock show hosts continue a popular oral tradition with its origins in the medicine show and the mountebanks of medieval Europe.
Worse still is the smearing of the victims to cover the vile politics of the mountebanks posing as political leaders.
He was followed by others, bears, mountebanks, lions and one daring unicorn complete with virgin.
Shakespeare found that villain among the mountebanks.
The bankers, some of whom are now fortunately former bankers, have created a terrible situation, so will my Right Hon Friend give them a verbal kicking instead of - as politicians too often do - letting those charlatans and mountebanks off the hook?
Though Pamela Allen Brown and others are starting to do this work, the emerging body of scholarship which the books reviewed here represent more typically focus on marginal forms of theater and performance (comedy rather than tragedy--or, in Tomlinson's case, Caroline rather than "high Renaissance" tragedy--the masque rather than the stage play) and often on yet still more critically marginalized forms of women's engagement with early modern performance cultures (women as dancers, singers, linen traders, mountebanks, rope dancers, or ballad sellers).
Women, Medicine and Theatre, 1500-1750: Literary Mountebanks and Performing Quacks.
It would be better to use this fine building as the replacement for the Lamby Way tip rather than allow the present mountebanks to defile the place with their shenanigans.
From a 2000 seminar of the Shakespeare Association of America, 14 essays examine such examples as universal suffrage in Medieval and early modern Lincolnshire, female mountebanks in England and Italy, reading the actress in Commedia imagery, and the theatrical evocation of Elizabeth Tudor in Heywood's If You Know Not Me, You Know Nobody, Part I.