moving-boundary electrophoresis

moving-boundary electrophoresis

[′müv·iŋ ¦bau̇n·drē i¦lek·trə·fə′rē·səs]
(analytical chemistry)
A U-tube variation of electrophoresis analysis that uses buffered solution so that all ions of a given species move at the same rate to maintain a sharp, moving front (boundary).
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The keynote speaker at the same Bruges conference was Arne Tiselius, who had won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1948 for his discovery of moving-boundary electrophoresis.