mudstone


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mudstone

[′məd‚stōn]
(geology)
An indurated equivalent of mud in the form of a blocky or massive, fine-grained sedimentary rock containing approximately equal proportions of silt and clay; lacks the fine lamination or fissility of shale.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now that we've arrived, we're seeing finely laminated mudstones in abundance.
limestones and mudstones of the Kimmeridge, Oxford and Lias rock
During the deposition of Member 2 of the Nenjiang Formation, the lake area reached the maximum and deposited a thick succession of dark mudstone.
This fact, along with firmground developed at the interface between the topmost Ordovician mudstone and black shale of the A.
Mudstone from the crater revealed that the lake could have existed for hundreds of thousands of years.
The dolomitic part of K1 is characterized to be mudstone, mudstone to packstone, beige, moderately hard to hard, crystalline to cryptocrystalline, have occasional pelloids, pebbles and shell fragments, have local mudcracks in mudstone, slightly argillaceous in parts, have thin layers of anhydrite and o have good to fair vuggy and intercrystalline porosity.
In contrast to the highly oxidized and acidic material constituting much of the Martian surface, this rock sample is made of a fine-grained mudstone containing clay minerals, a product of interaction between fresh water and igneous rock.
With regard to borehole water supplies in Finham they are drawn from an aquifer which is protected by a substantial layer of impermeable mudstone which protects the aquifer from surface contaminants.
The target was interpreted to be a zone of more intense iron oxide-iron carbonate-sulphide veining and breccia development within lower density interbedded siltstone and mudstone host rocks.
The mining of Whitby Mudstone in our region in the 1600s to feed this process brought to light ammonites (fossils) that are thousands of years old, enabling geologists like Beth to identify some of the marine creatures preserved in the rock, and hence get some idea of what conditions were like on Earth back then.
So far, however, it's simply not clear whether there's enough oil trapped in the carbonate mudstone to be worth the millions of dollars it costs to sink each well.