mulberry


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mulberry,

common name for the Moraceae, a family of deciduous or evergreen trees and shrubs, often climbing, mostly of pantropical distribution, and characterized by milky sap. Several genera bear edible fruit, e.g., Morus, (true mulberries), Ficus (the fig genus), and Artocarpus, which includes the breadfruit and related species. The related hemp family, whose plants do not contain latex, were formerly included in this family.

Common Species and Their Uses

The mulberry family is most important as the basis of the silkworm industry; silkworms feed on the leaves of the mulberries (genus Morus) and sometimes of the Osage orange (Maclura pomifera). The white mulberry (M. alba) has been cultivated in China since very early times. In the Middle Ages it began to replace the black mulberry (M. nigra), which had been grown by the Greeks and Romans and, from the 9th cent., by the people of N Europe for silkworm culture. In Greek legend the berries of the white mulberry turned red when its roots were bathed by the blood of the lovers Pyramis and Thisbe, who killed themselves. Both the white and the red mulberry (M. rubra, native to North America) have been cultivated in America since colonial times, but the lack of cheap hand labor prevented the establishment of a silkworm industry. Mulberry fruits are tender and juicy and resemble blackberries. In the South the fruit of M. rubra is made into wine and is considered a valuable agricultural and wildlife feed.

The Osage orange, also called bowwood because it was used by the Osage tribe to make bows, is a hardy tree native to the S central United States. Its fruit is used as a natural insect repellent. Cultivated widely, often as a hedge plant because of its spiny, impenetrable branches, it is a source of a flexible and durable wood and of a yellow-orange dye, from the root bark, that is similar to the more widely used fustic (Maclura tinctoria). The heartwood of fustic yields a yellowish or olive dye, also called fustic, that has been used chiefly for dyeing woolens; it has largely been replaced by synthetic aniline dyes. In its native habitat of Central and South America the fustic is also a timber tree.

Fiber plants of the mulberry family include the paper mulberry (Broussonetia papyrifera) and the upas tree (Antiaris toxicara) of the East Asian tropics, where the bast fiber is utilized for rough fabrics and for paper, often after a crude retting process. The latex of the upas [Malay,=poison tree] contains a cardiac glycoside used for arrow poison; the similarly employed strychnine tree of the loganialogania
, common name for the Loganiaceae, a family of herbs, shrubs, and trees of warmer climates, including many woody climbing species. Some plants of this family are grown in the United States as ornamentals, and several are sources of medicines and poisons.
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 family is sometimes also called upas.

The breadfruit (Artocarpus ultilis) is cultivated as a staple food plant in the Pacific tropics and in the West Indies, where it was introduced from Polynesia in the late 18th cent.; the Bounty was carrying breadfruit plants to Jamaica when the famous mutiny occurred. The compound, high-carbohydrate fruit has a taste when cooked that resembles that of fresh bread or cooked potatoes. The tree's wood, fiber, and latex are also variously utilized locally. The important figfig,
name for members of the genus Ficus of the family Moraceae (mulberry family). This large genus contains some 800 species of widely varied tropical vines (some of which are epiphytic); shrubs; and trees, including the banyan, the peepul, or bo tree, and the
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 genus includes fruit trees, ornamentals (e.g., the rubber plant), and several species renowned in the religion and legends of India (e.g., the banyanbanyan
, species of fig (Ficus bengalensis) of the family Moraceae (mulberry family), native to India, where it is venerated. Its seeds usually germinate in the branches of some tree where they have been dropped by birds.
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 and the bo treebo tree
or pipal
, fig tree (Ficus religiosa) of India held sacred by the Buddhists, who believe that Gautama received enlightenment under a bo tree at Bodh Gaya. A slip of this tree was planted at Anuradhapura to become one of the oldest known trees.
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).

Classification

The mulberry family is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Urticales.

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mulberry

mulberry

50 ft (15m) Delicious berries have powerful antioxidants, cancer prevention, life extension, cleans blood, strengthens kidneys, hearing, vision, diabetes, constipation, anemia, graying hair. The berries are great for improving vision. The bark is a laxative- leaves are an amalase inhibitor so they block the breakdown of carbohydrates into simple sugars, so it acts as a diet aid by preventing you from being able to absorb the carbohydrates. Root tea is used for tapeworms, urinary problems, bowel problems, diarrhea, dystentery. Sap used externally for ringworm. You can collect the leaves in the fall, dry them and use them as tea. Leaves used for heart conditions, cholesterol, liver problems (cleans liver), cancer, digestive issues. It is said there is almost nothing the leaves, bark, and gum resin boiled as tea cannot help alleviate from the body. The berries are great when dried. Mix with nuts and grind into pulp and make into "candy" balls. Male and female trees required for fruit.

mulberry

[′məl‚ber·ē]
(botany)
Any of various trees of the genus Morus (family Moraceae), characterized by milky sap and simple, often lobed alternate leaves.

mulberry

1. any moraceous tree of the temperate genus Morus, having edible blackberry-like fruit, such as M. alba (white mulberry), the leaves of which are used to feed silkworms
2. any of several similar or related trees, such as the paper mulberry and Indian mulberry
3. 
a. a dark purple colour
b. (as adjective): a mulberry dress
References in periodicals archive ?
Among them, paper mulberry pollen has the largest concentration in Islamabad and its peak season matches with March.
From the results of the present study, we concluded that addition of glucose and probiotic bacteria improved the chemical composition and ensiling characteristics of mulberry leaf.
One of the natural herbs that act as an antibacterial agent is black mulberry (Morus nigra) because of its high content of phenolic compounds as compared to other plants of genus Morus.
The show opens with an end -- the mulberry tree's death.
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Included on the Chris Evans "Taste Garden", the compact dwarf mulberry tree is the perfect size for small gardens and patios.
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ISLAMABAD -- The Federal Ombudsman will hear an important case regarding the alarming increase in allergy patients in federal capital due to paper mulberry trees.
Islamabad -- The Federal Ombudsman will hear an important case regarding the alarming increase of allergy patients in Federal Capital mainly due to the blooming of paper mulberry trees.
Eastern Consolidated Capital Advisory Division has arranged a $7 million loan to refinance a 4,500 s/f retail condo at 201 Mulberry Street in Nolita.
M2 EQUITYBITES-March 6, 2017-Kraig Biocraft Laboratories announces planting of first 2,000 mulberry trees in Texas
They're everywhere in summertime: Mulberry trees with berries the size of your thumb raining down upon you by the hundreds, and there's another tree just like it every 10 feet.