Mulch

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mulch,

any material, usually organic, that is spread on the ground to protect the soil and the roots of plants from the effects of soil crusting, erosion, or freezing; it is also used to retard the growth of weeds. A mulch may be made of materials such as straw, sawdust, grass clippings, peat moss, leaves, or paper. For large areas under cultivation a tilled layer of soil serves the purpose of a mulch.

Mulch

A layer of material such as wood chips, straw, and/or leaves, placed around plants to hold moisture, prevent weed growth, and enrich or sterilize the soil.

Mulch

 

a cover made of straw, reeds, and other longstemmed plants. A mulch is used to protect plants in greenhouses from cold temperatures at night; in very cold weather it is also used during the day. Mulches are made with a hand-operated tool or by a matting machine.


Mulch

 

a complete or interrow covering (as of mulch paper, crumbled peat, pulverized manure, humus, compost, or fallen leaves) on the soil. Mulching materials are used in agriculture in the cultivation of vegetables, fruits, berries, ornamentals, and other crops. Mulch reduces labor expenditures on interrow tilling and improves plant-growing conditions and soil fertility by conserving soil moisture, reducing the amplitude of soil temperature fluctuation, protecting the soil surface against scouring, preventing the formation of a soil crust, and preventing weed growth. As a rule, mulch increases the harvest of agricultural crops, particularly in arid regions. It is less effective on heavy and overly moist soils, on which it may even reduce the harvest.

The stubble of cereal grasses left on the fields for the winter plays the same role as mulch by protecting the soil against erosion. This procedure is of particular importance in the steppe regions of the USSR, where strong winds often prevail (Altai and Krasnoiarsk krais, Novosibirsk and Omsk oblasts, the northern part of the Kazakh SSR).

REFERENCES

Plodovodstvo, 2nd ed. [Edited by V. A. Kolesnikov.] Moscow, 1966. Pages 261–63.
Rubtsov, M. I., and V. P. Matveev. Ovoshchevodstvo. Moscow, 1970. Pages 181–82.

mulch

[məlch]
(materials)
A mixture of organic material, such as straw, peat moss, or leaves, that is spread over soil to prevent evaporation, maintain an even soil temperature, prevent erosion, control weeds, and enrich soil.

mulch

Material such as leaves, hay, straw, or the like, spread over the surface of the ground to protect the roots of newly planted shrubs or trees, of tender plants, etc., from the sun or from the cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last May, UC Cooperative Extension and Sunset tested mulches at UC's South Coast Field Station at Irvine.
Tomato plants growing in vetch plots were greener and bigger than plants in plots where plastic, paper, or no mulches were used.
Those organic mulches that rot away during a single growing season are best used in herbaceous plantings and vegetable gardens.
Note that all of this discussion is focused on winter mulches, not the pine bark permanent mulches that protect our trees and shrubs on a year-round basis.
Then we tested the modified unroller with several types of organic mulches for between-row weed control in organic watermelon plots.
The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the effect of various organic mulches and different thicknesses of the mulch layer on the SOC content.
Landscape mulches are often placed next to dwellings and other structures, which in turn may make the structure more susceptible to termite infestation.
Composts, soil conditioners and mulches AS4454-2003.
Similarly, other pests, for example the squash bug, Anasa tristis (DeGeer), and the American palm cixiid, Myndus crudus Van Duzee, are favored by the use of organic mulches (Howard & Oropeza 1998; Cranshaw et al.
The practicability of mulching large areas is questionable due to the large quantity of mulch required and the possibility of mulches harboring pests and diseases.
The elaborate mixing processes usually associated with blending mulches do not apply when blending landscape mulch with mushroom compost.
Organic mulches tend to improve the structure and nutrient content of the soil as they break down.