mule skinner

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mule skinner

[′myül ‚skin·ər]
(mining engineering)
A mule driver.
References in classic literature ?
We paid one guide and paid for one muleteer to each donkey.
A pack of ragged Portuguese muleteers crowded around us, offering their beasts at half a dollar an hour--more rascality to the stranger, for the market price is sixteen cents.
The donkeys all stood still after the catastrophe and waited for their dismembered saddles to be patched up and put on by the noisy muleteers.
We arrived home again finally, after a ten-mile excursion, and the irrepressible muleteers scampered at our heels through the main street, goading the donkeys, shouting the everlasting "Sekki-yah," and singing "John Brown's Body" in ruinous English.
LH: Does the muleteer actually move all those clocks with a man in them?
In a scene that develops in the province of the Aymaraes, along with a Spanish muleteer we see a personage with chin adornment leading a horse with alforjas full with six children procreated by priests.
Walker argues that this partnership should not be considered exceptional, not only an extension of Bastidas's long-standing involvement in the wide-ranging commercial dealings of her muleteer husband, but as typical of Andean marriages of this period, in which women often were engaged extensively with the cash economy and managed the household budget.
The priest made the necessary arrangements with a muleteer and sent her to our Hassitshe agent, from where she was sent to us.
Juan Vazquez, Muleteer of Seventeenth-Century Mexico", en The Americas, 37:4 (1981), pp.
Banker, an authority on the painter, told me at the press opening that Piero's father was a muleteer, a lucrative form of commercial transport in the fifteenth century.
42) In terms of labor, a very experienced muleteer could charge up to 10 pesos per month, while a skilled textile worker earned up to 5 pesos a month.
Contemporaneous Spanish readers of the novel would thus easily recognize the arrieros as mariscos (Redondo 64), and would therefore not be surprised to learn in chapter sixteen that another, wealthier muleteer might be a relative of Cide Hamete Benengeli.