mundane

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mundane

(jargon)
Someone outside some group that is implicit from the context, such as the computer industry or science fiction fandom. The implication is that those in the group are special and those outside are just ordinary.
References in periodicals archive ?
The show succeeds because it captures the mundaneness of everyday gangstering while playing on our expectations of genre.
Her mundaneness is confirmed by the escapist literature she reads, works that dismiss the world in favor of fantasy; the image of lovers "clinging to one another" in the Harlequin romances parodies her relationship with Rudolph (78), since she tries to control all aspects of his life.
The treatment of Chung Yu and his son Hui in the eight-century Shu-tuan by Chang Huai-kuan captures none of the mundaneness of the Chung family's struggles.
And they are quite properly emphasized, for all of their mundaneness, by the author.
Shaykh 'Abdul Fattah Abu Ghuddah, may Allah be well-pleased with him, considers this operative embedding of prudence and abstinence into the every-day mundaneness of earning a living to be a grand idea on the part of Imam Muhammad:
Through its mundaneness, ubiquity, and invisibility, the medium of radio allowed evangelical norms to become woven into the fabric of everyday life in Ecuador and thereby to seep into the consciousness of the masses at a deep, often imperceptible, level.
It may epitomise the mundaneness of suburban life, but the classic three-bedroom semi-detached house represents a pinnacle in house-building in Wales.
I don't think it is hindsight on my part to say that, at once, before we know anything about the family or the village, we have a strong sense of unease and disorientation, despite the mundaneness of the railroad journey.
His latest offering, Stealing My Rules, a dozen flash fictions ranging from a haunted piece of slipstream to a wacked-out version of cyberpunk space opera featuring the Great Ubu himself, carries more plot and ideas per paragraph than most fully formed novels and does so through a jagged prose that has little use for commas, subordinate clauses, or other emblems of linear mundaneness.