murine typhus


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Related to murine typhus: scrub typhus, bubonic plague

murine typhus

[′myu̇‚rīn ′tī·fəs]
(medicine)
A relatively mild, acute, febrile illness of worldwide distribution caused by Rickettsia mooseri, transmitted from rats to humans by the flea and characterized by headache, macular rash, and myalgia. Also known as endemic typhus; flea-borne typhus; rat typhus; shop typhus; urban typhus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Murine typhus as a common cause of fever of intermediate duration: a 17 year study in the South of Spain.
A confirmed case of murine typhus was defined as having compatible signs and symptoms and seroconversion (diagnostic cutoff of 1:64) or a 4-fold increase in IgG titer against R.
In agreement with infectious disease practitioners and the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Rickettsial Diseases, we chose to research murine typhus only in cases of fever of unknown origin lasting >7 days.
To determine prevalence of such cases, we conducted a search of published studies mentioning pulmonary manifestations of murine typhus (details in the online Technical Appendix, http://wwwnc.
Murine typhus has been reemerging in southeastern Mexico for the past 6 years (3,7).
Murine typhus was diagnosed on the basis of PCR amplification and immunofluorescent assay for antibodies to R.
Murine typhus is found throughout the world, widely distributed in subtropical and tropical regions, and is most apparent in port cities with large rat populations (2,4), which provide a reservoir for the pathogen and its main vector, the rat flea (Xenopsylla cheopsis).
To the Editor: An outbreak of murine typhus caused by Rickettsia typhi was confirmed among persons attending a 51-acre drug detoxification program 2.
Sentinel studies in Malaysia (1), Thailand (2), India (3), Laos (4), and Nepal (5) suggest that scrub and murine typhus are frequent and that misdiagnosis as enteric fever results in ineffective therapy (5).
typhi, primarily transmitted by the oriental rat flea (Xenopsylla cheopis), has a worldwide distribution and causes murine typhus in humans (2).
Among patients with fever in Nepal, murine typhus and scrub typhus are frequently described (1), but tick-borne rickettsioses remain underinvestigated.
Alternative vectors for rickettsiae are well known, including fleas as vectors for murine typhus (R.