muscle fiber

(redirected from muscle cell)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

muscle fiber

[′məs·əl ‚fī·bər]
(histology)
The contractile cell or unit of which muscle is composed.
References in periodicals archive ?
December 18, 2017 -- Scientists here have developed a new strategy to efficiently isolate, mature and transplant skeletal muscle cells created from human pluripotent stem cells, which can produce all cell types of the body.
McNeil predicts that vitamin E supplementation will be used not only to improve muscle cell membrane repair in diseases such as muscular dystrophy, but as a protective measure for individuals at risk of injury.
ISLAMABAD -- Young humans (infants, children and adolescents) are capable of generating new heart muscle cells, US researchers have found.
The lack of desmin in the aganglionic colon results in a lack of muscle integrity and weakens the mechanochemical signaling within the muscle cell.
Neointimal smooth muscle cell phenotype is important in its susceptibility to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection: a study in rat.
The research team from the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor worked with two types of mouse cell - precursor muscle cells called myoblasts and precursor fat cells called preadipocytes.
Over time, the muscle cells block the flow of air, blood, and lymph to and from the lungs, preventing the lungs from providing oxygen to the rest of the body.
She and her laboratory members fused mouse muscle cells with human skin cells to create hybrids called heterokaryons.
Stem cells can be triggered to change into heart muscle cells by a new method involving synthetic molecules.
Frisen and his colleagues found that samples from people born before 1955 did indeed have carbon 14 in heart muscle cell DNA, indicating that the cells had been created after the person's birth.
These results give us the first indication that muscle cell transplants, even from an entirely different kind of muscle, could one day be used to help repair damaged, failing hearts without danger of rejection," said Francis Pagani, MD of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.