musket

(redirected from musketry)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

musket:

see small armssmall arms,
firearms designed primarily to be carried and fired by one person and, generally, held in the hands, as distinguished from heavy arms, or artillery. Early Small Arms

The first small arms came into general use at the end of the 14th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Musket

 

a hand firearm with a matchlock.

The musket first appeared in the early 16th century in Spain and then in Germany, France, and Russia. It had a caliber of about 20 mm and weighed from 8 to 10 kg. Because of a powerful recoil, muskets were at first supplied only to select soldiers—the musketeers—who wore a leather pad on their shoulder when firing. Monopods (rests) were introduced to make firing muskets more comfortable. In the late 17th century muskets were replaced by flintlock rifles, at first in France and then in other countries. In Russia the term “musket” denoted flintlock rifles until the early 19th century.

References in classic literature ?
Children cast themselves on the ground, and rolled back and forth cheering and whooping; strong men, their faces hidden in their clothes, swayed in silence, till the agony became insupportable, and they threw up their heads and bayed at the sun; women, mothers and virgins, shrilled shriek upon mounting shriek, and slapped their thighs as it might have been the roll of musketry.
There was a roar of musketry, and then answering flashes and roars from temple and rampart.
Indispensable; and we will descend, even if we have to do so with a volley of musketry.
The Parvis was filled with a thick smoke, which the musketry streaked with flame.
Weariness, the lack of good weapons, the fright of this surprise, the musketry from the windows, the valiant attack of the king's troops, all overwhelmed them.
At length the signal came--a sharp rattle of musketry, and like one man, an answering volley tore from the jungle to the west and to the south.
He closed his eyes, and immediately a sound of cannonading, of musketry and the rattling of carriage wheels seemed to fill his ears, and now again drawn out in a thin line the musketeers were descending the hill, the French were firing, and he felt his heart palpitating as he rode forward beside Schmidt with the bullets merrily whistling all around, and he experienced tenfold the joy of living, as he had not done since childhood.
At the same instant, just as Jane Clayton was congratulating herself that the ship was once more free, there fell upon her ears from a point up the river about where the Kincaid had been anchored the rattle of musketry and a woman's scream--shrill, piercing, fear-laden.
At the shot the prahu slowed up, and a volley of musketry from her crew satisfied Sing that he had made no mistake in classifying her.
Nor was this less ominous than the rattle of musketry, for it suggested but a single solution to the little band of rescuers--that the illy garrisoned village had already succumbed to the onslaught of a superior force.
Yesterday, and for many days and nights previously, we were fighting somewhere; always there was cannonading, with occasional keen rattlings of musketry, mingled with cheers, our own or the enemy's, we seldom knew, attesting some temporary advantage.
Some reported that the riots were effectually put down; others that they had broken out again: some said that Lord George Gordon had been sent under a strong guard to the Tower; others that an attempt had been made upon the King's life, that the soldiers had been again called out, and that the noise of musketry in a distant part of the town had been plainly heard within an hour.