mycobiont


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Related to mycobiont: phycobiont, photobiont

mycobiont

[¦mī·kə′bī‚änt]
(botany)
The fungal component of a lichen, commonly an ascomycete.
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The cyanobacteria colonies of few to numerous cells adhered to the mycobiont at irregular intervals along the association.
The somewhat eroded cell wall of a mycobiont below and attached cyanobacterial colony (Fig.
If so, any beneficial variants and characters in the photobiont cannot be acquired by another mycobiont.
2], 28 combinations of four mycobionts and 21 photobiont genotypes, suggesting the possibility that either a) the area was colonised from several separate sources, on each occasion, the mycobiont bringing the photobiont strain with which it became symbiotic when it last reproduced from spores or b) lichens thalli change photobionts without reproducing by spores.
For these albeit limited examples, there seems to be no consistent, or discernable, pattern of mycobiont versus photobiont diversity at the generic level.
2005) have found that the Nostoc cyanobiont strains are more like those in other symbioses and local free living populations of Nostoc than to each other indicating that the mycobiont acquires whatever Nostoc is available in its environment.
neglecta and concluded that the two species differed only in the photobiont, rather than the mycobiont which appeared to be identical in both "species".
In conclusion, there appears to be no discemable pattern of photobiont variation based on molecular evidence associated with mycobiont diversity, confirming a very similar conclusion based on less molecular evidence by Ahmadjian (1993b).
What appears to happen is that the mycobiont acquires a photobiont phenotype from the existing unlichenized population and, later, when the lichen thallus senesces, these cells eventually die without allowing the genotypes to enter into combination with another mycobiont.
One possibility is the joint dispersal of mycobiont spores and photobiont cells.
The release of carbohydrate by the photobiont was once thought of as an evolutionary adaptation to being lichenized in a "trade-off" for other survival "benefits" such as the mycobiont providing a microhabitat for the photobiont, safe from browsing herbivores.
Until there is further evidence to the contrary, it is likely that the photobiont cells in most lichens die with the lichen thallus and are not acquired by another mycobiont and are not subject to further selection.