myelin


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Related to myelin: demyelination, Myelin basic protein

myelin

, myeline
a white tissue forming an insulating sheath (myelin sheath) around certain nerve fibres. Damage to the myelin sheath causes neurological disease, as in multiple sclerosis

myelin

[′mī·ə·lən]
(neuroscience)
A soft, white fatty substance that forms a sheath around certain nerve fibers.
References in periodicals archive ?
For more information please contact: The Myelin Project at info@myelin.
Myelin has broad effects on the coordination of movement and the speed of reflexes, which allows animals to move quickly and easily.
Myelin is critical for allowing nerve impulses to be transmitted quickly and affects our ability to walk, speak and see.
is screening zebrafish genes to identify those that may control myelin formation.
Even more important, they showed that iOPCs could regenerate new myelin coatings around nerves after being transplanted to mice-a result that offers hope the technique might be used to treat human myelin disorders.
Through this unique collaboration, the newly launched MRF Translational Medicine Center will assess the myelin regenerating capabilities of proprietary small molecule compounds from ENDECE Neural in novel MRF Multiple Sclerosis models for their effectiveness in reversing myelin damage.
Damage to myelin can cause the symptoms of MS but there are currently no treatments to repair it.
The body's nerve fibres are sheathed in myelin - which both insulates and helps the passage of electrical signals.
Electron microscopic examination of the tissue showed that myelin was indeed produced around the axons by the transplanted cells.
Inhalants dissolve the protective coating called myelin on the neurons, or cells in the brain.
A characteristic feature of all nerves was the irregular appearance of the myelin (e.
The paralysis and numbness of MS, for instance, results when immune cells destroy myelin, the fibrous sheath that surrounds nerve cells and helps them conduct signals.