myoclonus

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myoclonus

[mī′äk·lə·nəs]
(medicine)
Clonic muscle spasm.
Any disorder characterized by scattered, irregular, arrhythmic muscle spasms.
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0[degrees]C and [greater than or equal to] 2 of the following: irritability/pain, rash, diarrhea, tachycardia, tachypnea, encephalitis, myoclonic jerks, or hepatitis.
Patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy tend to have similar or better quality of life scores in adulthood in comparison with patients with absence epilepsy except when there are comorbid psychiatric conditions, according to findings from a case-control study.
The next day, the patient developed a myoclonic jerk with normal mental status, which was relieved with clonazepam.
Seizure types, which vary among patients, include tonic (stiffening of the body, upward deviation of the eyes, dilation of the pupils, and altered respiratory patterns), atonic (brief loss of muscle tone and consciousness, causing abrupt falls), atypical absence (staring spells), and myoclonic (sudden muscle jerks).
Most useful for treatment of partial seizures and can worsen certain types of generalized seizures, including atonic, absence and myoclonic
He was internalized with a prediagnosis of benign infantile myoclonic epilepsy.
This was followed by myoclonic jerks, hand tremors, gait instability, and visual hallucinations which were all noted upon presentation.
Talking about juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (disorder characterised with abnormal movement of any part of the body when the patient wakes up in the morning) in Qatar, the official said there were many patients with the condition.
Dr Mesraoua, who spoke about 'Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: what is new in Qatar' during a session on epilepsy at the symposium mentioned that about 25 patients aged between eight and 16 years, suffering from the disease are being followed at HMC neurology department.
Dr John Jenkins from the University of London in 2001, found that when patients with myoclonic epilepsy were made to listen to classical music, the number of convulsions, and their severity, were significantly reduced.
New technology that permits the sequencing of 20,000 genes for less than $1,000 is leading to the rapid discovery of genes underlying rare forms of epilepsy, such as the identification of the GOSR2 gene responsible for progressive myoclonic epilepsy (Am.