Myoma

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myoma

[mī′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A benign uterine tumor composed principally of smooth muscle cells.
Any neoplasm originating in muscle.

Myoma

 

a benign tumor of muscle tissue. A myoma that develops from smooth muscle (uterus, intestine, stomach, skin) is called a leiomyoma; a myoma forming from striated skeletal or heart muscle is a rhabdomyoma. Leiomyomas of the stomach and intestine and rhabdomyomas are rare; they are found accidentally during surgery or in autopsies. Besides muscle fibers, a myoma usually contains connective tissue and resembles a fibromyoma.

Myomas (fibromyomas) of the uterus are very common. The tumors are generally multiple and consist of individual nodules of different sizes and shapes. Some tumors weigh several kilograms. Fibromyomas of the uterus result from hormonal disturbances related to ovarian function. They occur most often in women over 30 years of age. Myomas may cause prolonged bleeding, which is followed by anemia and compression of the urinary bladder, blood vessels, and nerves of the minor pelvis. The tumor continues to grow until menstruation ceases, usually when the woman is between the ages of 50 and 55. If a tumor is discovered, the woman should be examined by a physician three or four times a year. Surgery is indicated if the tumor is large or exhibits rapid growth and if the bleeding does not respond to conservative treatment.

REFERENCES

Petchenko, A. I. Fibromiomy matki. Kiev, 1958.
Giliazutdinova, Z. Sh. K patogenezu fibromiomy matki. Kazan, 1967.
Persianinov, L. S. Operativnaia ginekologiia. Moscow, 1971.

L. S. PERSIANINOV

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References in periodicals archive ?
With the pelvic images, a myomatous uterus was seen with a small mass right postero-lateral to the uterus.
Pigmented myomatous neurocristoma of the uterus has been reported, but the source of pigment was considered to be melanocytic blue nevus cells within the leiomyoma not pigmented smooth muscle cells.
This "ingenious" technique, developed in the preantibiotic era for removing an infected or cancerous uterus without having to open the endometrial cavity, will turn a very large globular shaped or myomatous uterus into a cylindrical object that can more easily be removed.