Myxoma

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myxoma

[mik′sō·mə]
(medicine)
A benign tumor composed of mucinous connective tissue.

Myxoma

 

a benign tumor made up of connective tissue and containing a large amount of mucus. Myxomas arise from residues of embryonic (mucous) connective tissue or from mucous transformation of fibromas or lipomas. They may be found in all organs, particularly in the extremities, subcutaneous tissue, and mesentery. Myxomas are treated by surgery; they may recur if not completely excised.

References in periodicals archive ?
12,13] Aortic regurgitation has been found in association with atrial myxomas where the tumour pedicle is attached to the atrial septum close to the aortic root.
A 38-year-old woman had surgical excision of a right atrial myxoma in March 2008 and excision of a recurrence in August 2012.
The description of extragnathic odontogenic sinonasal myxoma is rarely reported in the literature (1).
Virulence and pathogenesis of the MSW and MSD strains of Californian myxoma virus in European rabbits with genetic resistance to myxomatosis compared to rabbits with no genetic resistance.
The tumor was surgically removed, and the histologic examination was consistent with myxoma (Figure 3).
Juxta-articular myxoma (JAM) is a rare, benign, soft tissue tumour with accumulation of mucinous material usually in the vicinity of large joints (1).
Fibromyxomatous spindle-cell neoplasms are distinguished from myxomas by the presence in the former of a large population of nonreactive fibroblasts and an uncharacterized immunophenotype.
Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors, accounting for 30% of all primary cardiac tumors.
Overproduction of interleukin-6 has been linked to the principal mediator of the acute-phase protein responsible for symptoms such as fever, anemia, and arthralgia experienced by patients with cardiac myxomas, and raised serum levels may become undetectable after resection of the neoplasm (2).
1) Myxomas most commonly occur in the left atrium (90%) and are generally attached to the atrial septum in or adjacent to the fossa ovalis.