n-butylamine


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n-butylamine

[¦en ¦byüd·əl·ə¦mēn]
(organic chemistry)
C4H9NH2 A colorless, flammable liquid; miscible with water and ethanol; used as an intermediate in organic synthesis and to make insecticides, emulsifying agents, and pharmaceuticals.
References in periodicals archive ?
To test the ability of n-butylamine to fully react with acetic anhydride, cytochrome C (bovine) was added to a vial already containing a 2:1 molar ratio of n-butylamine to acetic anhydride.
In general, protein samples are exposed to acetic anhydride, and then the excess anhydride is reacted with n-butylamine.
On the other hand, in n-butylamine the maximum resistance was found only for the crystalline specimens at 60[degrees]C.
f] (h) n-Butylamine Sample 23[degrees]C 60[degrees]C AmVBPET 0.
Figure 5 shows the amorphous specimens tested in dibutylamine, which has a higher molar volume in comparison to n-butylamine.
The lower molar volume of n-butylamine compared to dibutylamine favors its absorption by the polymer chains leading to a lower ESC resistance.
6, the amorphous VBPET in n-butylamine presented a bending failure and a shorter time to failure (5 min) at 60[degrees]C, but the specimen was more damaged at 23[degrees]C, as it presented a total break.
In relation to the behavior of the amorphous VFPET in n-butylamine, it presented exactly the same behavior as the amorphous VBPET, considering the time to failure as well as the final appearance of the tested specimens.
A better selection of the condition to determine the differences in ESC resistance between VBPET and VFPET in n-butylamine was reached when the respective crystalline specimens were tested, as shown in Fig.