naive

(redirected from naively)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to naively: placating

naive

Untutored in the perversities of some particular program or system; one who still tries to do things in an intuitive way, rather than the right way (in really good designs these coincide, but most designs aren't "really good" in the appropriate sense). This trait is completely unrelated to general maturity or competence or even competence at any other specific program. It is a sad commentary on the primitive state of computing that the natural opposite of this term is often claimed to be "experienced user" but is really more like "cynical user".
References in periodicals archive ?
At most [Dirceu] committed a political error or acted naively for having trusted Waldomiro.
But in this case, Peter Blundell Jones naively claims 'the Kunsthaus is a highly innovative building with potential for a new and exciting dialogue with artists'.
I had volunteered to serve my country, naively thinking that the orders that I would be asked to carry out would be both just and legal.
I naively thought that this movie would play great in shopping malls because all the kids I know would like it," he says.
But progressives find themselves resisting those who naively claim that the existence of multiracial people effectively ends racist thinking.
brain-dead) postwar university education system, Takenaka is an example of a specific type of Japanese bureaucrat: those who spoke English and found it easy to establish an international profile while naively embracing Western supply-side dogma.
And Britain received no support from the United States, whose policy was unequivocally (and extremely naively and short-sightedly) aimed at creating a political union in Europe--and initially wanted Britain out because it, just like de Gaulle, believed British entry would make full political union more difficult.
Back in 1989, as a practicing clinician with little true management experience but with a "job title," I had naively considered myself a physician executive.
With quiet understatement, Nesbitt recalled the moment of the toast and their naively high hopes: `It wasn't until a few days later when we started to look around that we realized what we had got ourselves into.
She naively assured me that this was a voluntary club.
They naively believe they will get promoted through hard work, but quickly realise they need to stitch up colleagues to succeed, a new study shows.