Naïveté

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Naïveté

Agnes
young girl, affects to be simple and ingenuous. [Fr. Lit.: L’Ecole des Femmes]
babes in the woods
applied to easily deceived or naive persons. [Folklore: Jobes, 169]
beardlessness
traditional representation of innocence and inexperience. [Western Folklore: Jobes, 190]
Carlisle, Lady Mary
couldn’t determine true nobility. [Am. Lit.: Monsieur Beaucaire, Magill I, 616–617]
Curlylocks
nursery rhyme heroine exemplifies innocence. [Folk-lore: Jobes, 398]
Do-Right, Dudley
Canadian mountie do-gooder. [TV: “The Dudley Do-Right Show” in Terrace, I, 229–230]
Dondi
foster child; confronts world with wide-eyed innocence. [Comics: Horn, 217–218]
Errol, Cedric
seven-year-old believes the best of everyone. [Am. Lit.: Little Lord Fauntleroy]
Evelina
17-year-old ingenuously circulates through fashionable London. [Br. Lit.: Evelina]
Georgette
Ted Baxter’s pretty, ignorant wife. [TV: “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” in Terrace, II, 70–71]
Little Nell
meek little girl reared by grandfather. [Br. Lit.: The Old Curiosity Shop]
Miller, Daisy
innocent and ignorant American girl put in compromising European situations. [Am. Lit.: Daisy Miller]
Miranda
innocent and noble-minded daughter of Prospero. [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]
Myshkin, Prince
loved for his innocence and frankness, lack of sophistication, and kind heart. [Russ. Lit.: Dostoevsky The Idiot]
Schlemihl, Peter
archetypal innocent; sold soul to devil. [Ger. Lit.: Peter Schlemihl; Fr. Opera: Westerman, Tales of Hoffman, 274–277]
Shosha
narrator’s mentally backward and utterly artless wife. [Am. Lit.: Shosha]
Tessa
childlike young woman who thinks herself wedded to Tito and obeys his command to tell nobody of their supposed marriage. [Br. Lit.: George Eliot Romola]
Topsy
young slave girl; completely naive. [Am. Lit.: Uncle Tom’s Cabin]
white lilac
flowers indicative of naivete, callowness. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
References in classic literature ?
This naivete of expectation drove me to fury, but I restrained myself.
You wrote from your heart and you do not know the delightful naivete which is in every line.
The fair Indian, astonished at the sensation her observation produced, looked down and resumed her air of naivete.