stereotype

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stereotype

(stĕr`ĕətīp'), plate from which printing is done, made by casting metal in a mold, usually of paper pulp. The process was patented in 1725 by the Scottish inventor William Ged. Firmin Didot improved the process, named it, and extended its use. Cylinder presses, by which newspapers were traditionally printed, use curved stereotype plates that fit the cylinders. For other applications, stereotype has largely been replaced by electrotype.

stereotype

a set of inaccurate, simplistic generalizations about a group of individuals which enables others to categorize members of this group and treat them routinely according to these expectations. Thus stereotypes of RACIAL, SOCIAL CLASS, and GENDER groups are commonly held and lead to the perception and treatment of individuals according to unjustified preconceptions. See also PREJUDICE.

Stereotype

 

a duplicate of a typeform (type and cuts) used in letterpress printing, consisting of a one-piece plate 2–25.1 mm thick. Stereotypes first appeared in the 18th century and are now widely used to print large numbers of copies. Stereotypes are classified according to the method used to produce them as cast (made of type metal), electrotyped, and molded. They can be made entirely of metal (type metal alone or type metal with a layer of a more durable metal deposited on the printing side) or of polymer (plastics or rubber), or they can be made of a combination of a metal and polymer (metal on the printing side and polymer on the reverse side). The shape of rigid stereotypes—those made of metal or of metal and a polymer—depends on the type of printing press used. Flat stereotypes are used with platen and cylinder presses. Curved stereotypes are used with rotary presses.

stereotype

[′ster·ē·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A duplicate printing plate made from type and cuts; a paper matrix, or mat, is forced down over the type and cuts to form a mold, into which molten metal is poured, resulting in a new metal printing surface that exactly duplicates the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main purpose of this study is to explore whether adolescents use gay-related name-calling as a response to the violation of gender norms by boys more frequently than as a response to disliked or stupid behaviour, in order to criticise, hurt or put someone down, in order to tease in a nice way, and as a reference to actual or suspected sexual orientation.
It is easy to dismiss the name-calling as a handful of adults acting "childish.
We don't always know how individuals in a student audience have adjusted their name-calling habits on their own, because of a newfound social awareness.
Despite the rise of political correctness, such weight-related name-calling was most widespread among the young.
As part of their training, teachers and administrators from each school will discuss bias, discrimination, prejudice, bullying, and name-calling -- and how to recognize it and stop it when it happens, Betz said.
Many may think verbal abuse and name-calling is just a part of life.
While fair-trade advocates might be called names like "protectionist," perhaps the direction of the name-calling should be reversed and those seemingly out of touch with reality and fairness could be labeled "economic extremists.
Don't you just love how after careful review of the data, the prescription for American public schools is always more testing, increased sanctions, louder name-calling and longer seat-time?
Robert Knight, director of Concerned Women for America's Culture and Family Institute, criticizing "No Name-Calling Week," an annual event sponsored by the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (Associated Press, Jan.
This project, No Name- Calling Week, is an annual week of educational activities aimed at ending name-calling of all kinds and providing schools with the tools and inspiration to launch an on-going dialogue about ways to eliminate bullying in their communities and ensure safe and effective schools for all students.
CHILDREN and teenagers in Coventry have to endure racist taunting, name-calling and sometimes even racist violence at school says a shock report.