stereotype

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stereotype

(stĕr`ĕətīp'), plate from which printing is done, made by casting metal in a mold, usually of paper pulp. The process was patented in 1725 by the Scottish inventor William Ged. Firmin Didot improved the process, named it, and extended its use. Cylinder presses, by which newspapers were traditionally printed, use curved stereotype plates that fit the cylinders. For other applications, stereotype has largely been replaced by electrotype.

stereotype

a set of inaccurate, simplistic generalizations about a group of individuals which enables others to categorize members of this group and treat them routinely according to these expectations. Thus stereotypes of RACIAL, SOCIAL CLASS, and GENDER groups are commonly held and lead to the perception and treatment of individuals according to unjustified preconceptions. See also PREJUDICE.

Stereotype

 

a duplicate of a typeform (type and cuts) used in letterpress printing, consisting of a one-piece plate 2–25.1 mm thick. Stereotypes first appeared in the 18th century and are now widely used to print large numbers of copies. Stereotypes are classified according to the method used to produce them as cast (made of type metal), electrotyped, and molded. They can be made entirely of metal (type metal alone or type metal with a layer of a more durable metal deposited on the printing side) or of polymer (plastics or rubber), or they can be made of a combination of a metal and polymer (metal on the printing side and polymer on the reverse side). The shape of rigid stereotypes—those made of metal or of metal and a polymer—depends on the type of printing press used. Flat stereotypes are used with platen and cylinder presses. Curved stereotypes are used with rotary presses.

stereotype

[′ster·ē·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A duplicate printing plate made from type and cuts; a paper matrix, or mat, is forced down over the type and cuts to form a mold, into which molten metal is poured, resulting in a new metal printing surface that exactly duplicates the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
After much name-calling, one of our students finally called out the "n-word.
But he should follow his own advice and stop the name-calling.
Even though gay-related name-calling has been found to be associated with anti-gay attitudes (Bum, 2000; Franklin, 2000), anti-gay jokes may not always be manifestations of anti-gay behaviour (Jewell & Morrison, 2010).
It isn't a laugh and it is a serious thing and even if you did think it's just a bit of name-calling it really hurts people.
Despite the rise of political correctness, such weight-related name-calling was most widespread among the young.
My deliberate silence echoes that silence, which is caused by anti-LGBT bullying, name-calling and harassment.
As part of their training, teachers and administrators from each school will discuss bias, discrimination, prejudice, bullying, and name-calling -- and how to recognize it and stop it when it happens, Betz said.
Hudson's juvenile name-calling reminds me of that kindergarten response "Takes one to know one.
CHILDREN in Walsall want more interesting school lessons, greater respect and a ban on name-calling, according to members of a youth group.
Terence Noble came to expect to be the victim of cruel name-calling, stone-throwing, pushing and shoving on a daily basis.
In the political arena, the center is pretty much left out of the name-calling.
Cllr Anderson's stinging words outraged the Liberal Democrat benches and prompted Cllr Bradley to call for an end to council name-calling