nappy

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nappy

1. of alcoholic drink, esp beer
a. having a head; frothy
b. strong or heady
2. (of a horse) jumpy or irritable; nervy
3. any strong alcoholic drink, esp heady beer
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References in classic literature ?
He must bring nothing outside; we will go in -- in among the dirt, and possibly other repulsive things, -- and take the food with the household, and after the fashion of the house, and all on equal terms, except the man be of the serf class; and finally, there will be no ewer and no napkin, whether he be serf or free.
On the marble slab were two plates, two napkins, two rolls of bread, and a dish, with another napkin in it, on which reposed two quaint little black balls.
Stepan Arkadyevitch crushed the starchy napkin, tucked it into his waistcoat, and settling his arms comfortably, started on the oysters.
Oblonsky took off his overcoat, and with his hat over one ear walked into the dining room, giving directions to the Tatar waiters, who were clustered about him in evening coats, bearing napkins.
Lemons, oranges and paper napkins, arranged with mathematical precision, sat among the glasses.
When the council broke up on the sixth day the Sultan said to his vizir: "I see a certain woman in the audience-chamber every day carrying something in a napkin.
A woman, about six months after, came to claim it with the other half of the napkin.
No, only add two bottles of champagne, and the difference will be for the napkins.
There was one seedy French waiter, who was attempting to learn English in a house where he never heard anything but French; and the customers were a few ladies of easy virtue, a menage or two, who had their own napkins reserved for them, and a few queer men who came in for hurried, scanty meals.
Everything from the table napkins to the silver, china, and glass bore that imprint of newness found in the households of the newly married.
It had been a simple, a nutritious diet; but there had been nothing exciting about it, and the odour of Burgundy, and the smell of French sauces, and the sight of clean napkins and long loaves, knocked as a very welcome visitor at the door of our inner man.
I may leave her now with her sheets and collars and napkins and fronts.