Napoleon

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Napoleon

 

(in French, napoléon d’or), a French gold coin worth 20 francs and containing 5.8 g of pure gold. Minted since 1803, the coin takes its name from the likenesses of Napoleon I and Napoleon III that it displays. Double napoleons (worth 40 francs), half napoleons (worth 10 francs), and quarter napoleons (worth 5 francs) have also been minted. Since the 1950’s, napoleons have been minted by the Bank of France for sale to private gold hoarders. [17–713 -1]

Napoleon

(1769–1821) vanquished most of Europe. [Fr. Hist.: Harvey, 570]
References in periodicals archive ?
At the start of his essay on Napoleon, Emerson examines the mystic and philosopher Emanuel Swedenborg's conception of the body.
Emerson supposed that for business-like, energetic, and thoughtful people in both Europe and America, Napoleon was the embodiment of the democrat, that in him were concentrated all the flaws and achievements of democracy:
In drafts of War and Peace, Tolstoy characterizes Napoleon thus: "A clever, sly, and evil philistine with plenty of success but nothing more" (PSS 13: 505).
So this is what Kagan, who has taught at West Point and is now a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, sets out to rectify in his mammoth four-volume undertaking on the Napoleonic wars, of which The End of the Old Order: Napoleon and Europe 1801-1805 is the first volume.
According to Kagan, it was not a tummy ache that felled Napoleon at Waterloo but rather the coalition that had been formed against him, and it is the theme of coalition-building that has Kagan's great interest: how counties face up to the threat posed by a Napoleon, the essential undeterrable man.
There are mounting fears that wild stocks of Napoleon wrasse are being reduced by the multi-million-dollar live reef-fish industry.
Despite their value, little is known about Napoleon wrasse, leaving the door wide open for me to start my research.
After the revolution, Napoleon reconsiders this view and determines that it is indeed essential to devote a significant proportion of the farm's total resources toward assisting him in his new and important position as the farm's overseer.
Again, somewhere into the growth process, Napoleon is found to have reconsidered this decision and devoted considerable resources to education, along with appropriate remunerations for the attainment of the proper education.
Although Wood's have had little greyhound involvement, the intention is to maintain the profile Napoleons have built up around major greyhound events.
Even before the Battle of Trafalgar was fought, Napoleon had turned away from the English Channel and was marching his Grand Army with dramatic swiftness to his greatest victory.
Few military commanders in history have been as bold as Napoleon.