Napoleon

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Napoleon

 

(in French, napoléon d’or), a French gold coin worth 20 francs and containing 5.8 g of pure gold. Minted since 1803, the coin takes its name from the likenesses of Napoleon I and Napoleon III that it displays. Double napoleons (worth 40 francs), half napoleons (worth 10 francs), and quarter napoleons (worth 5 francs) have also been minted. Since the 1950’s, napoleons have been minted by the Bank of France for sale to private gold hoarders. [17–713 -1]

Napoleon

(1769–1821) vanquished most of Europe. [Fr. Hist.: Harvey, 570]
References in classic literature ?
Austerlitz, where the army was manoeuvred as if it had been a review; Eylau, where the Russians were drowned in a lake, just as if Napoleon had breathed on them and blown them in; Wagram, where the fighting was kept up for three whole days without flinching.
Then it was made clear beyond a doubt that Napoleon bore the Sword of God in his scabbard.
So the Russian backs up our enemies the English; for there had always been something to prevent Napoleon from putting a spoke in their wheel.
It was all Asia against Europe,' as the Red Man had said to Napoleon.
All right,' Napoleon had answered, 'I shall be ready for them.
The marshals fall out among themselves, and make blunders, as was only natural, for Napoleon in his kindness had fed them on gold till they had grown as fat as butter, and they had no mind to march.
He had thought of killing himself, so that no one should behold Napoleon after his defeat; like Jesus Christ before the Crucifixion, he thought himself forsaken by God and by his talisman, and so he took enough poison to kill a regiment, but it had no effect whatever upon him.
It was on March 1st that Napoleon set out with two hundred men to conquer the kingdom of France and Navarre, which by March 20th had become the French Empire again.
They seize Napoleon by treachery, the English shut him up on a desert island in the ocean, on a rock ten thousand feet above the rest of the world.
Whenever Napoleon grew tired of seeing his battalions gain no ground towards the end of a victory, he would say to Murat, 'Here, you
Kagan dispassionately dissects Napoleons failures as well as his successes--as was indeed Napoleon's own method when studying the ancients and Frederick the Great: "Read and meditate upon the wars of the greatest captains," he admonished.
When I launched the Pierre Herme pastry and chocolate business in 1997, The New York Times published a piece about it titled "The Pastry Emperor Who Marshals Napoleons.