narcosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to narcosis: carbon dioxide narcosis

narcosis

(närkō`sĭs), state of stupor induced by drugs. The use of narcotics as a therapeutic aid in psychiatry is believed to have a history dating back to the use of opium for mental disorders by the early Egyptians. Prolonged narcosis was employed at the beginning of the 20th cent.; its chief value was the reduction of excitement and tension in the psychotic patient. J. S. Horsley introduced (1936) the term narcoanalysis for the use of narcotics to induce a trancelike state in which the patient talks freely and intensive psychotherapy may be applied. It was used with considerable success in treatment of acute combat psychoneuroses during World War II.

narcosis

[när′kō·səs]
(medicine)
Drug-produced state of profound stupor, unconsciousness, or arrested activity.

narcosis

unconsciousness induced by narcotics or general anaesthetics
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples are infections, bronchospasm, oxygen-induced carbon dioxide narcosis, sedative administration, heart failure or other associated illnesses.
stramonium intake include elation, narcosis and perceptive distortion and even the complete loss of any sense of reality.
A March 1987 report titled Organic Solvent Neurotoxicity, by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), states: "The acute neurotoxic effects of organic solvent exposure in workers and laboratory animals are narcosis, anesthesia, central nervous system (CNS) depression, respiratory arrest, unconsciousness, and death.
The medical abortion is carried out pharmacologically within nine weeks of pregnancy and the surgical instrumentally within twelve weeks, usually during narcosis.
New Zealand free diver William Trubridge, 29, risked suffering from nitrogen narcosis, which occurs at great depths, and which produces a state similar to being drunk, reports Stuff.
Treat any strong painkiller as a potential narcotic - which comes from the word narcosis, meaning to go to sleep.
It was like narcosis, and yet accompanied by an inexplicable restlessness.
It was a cool late-summer eve and a low, steady voice was seeping over the amphitheatre, lulling the children present -- and a few of the adults -- into a state of narcosis.
Prolonged inhalation may lead to mucous membrane irritation, fatigue, drowsiness, dizziness and/or lightheadedness, headache, un-coordination, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gastrointestinal disturbances, blurred vision, coughing, choking, difficulty with speech, central nervous system depression, intoxication, tightness of chest, anesthetic effect or narcosis, difficulty of breathing, allergic response, asthmatic reaction, tremors, abnormal blood pressure, severe respiratory tract irritation, severe lung irritation or damage, liver damage, kidney damage, pulmonary edema, pneumoconiosis, loss of consciousness, cyanosis, respiratory failure, asphyxiation, death.
Our Islamic community has been subjected to a dangerous process of narcosis.
Contending that filmic displays of narcotic effects such as camera shake, blurred focus, filtered shots, and superimpositions might also "induce virtual narcosis by cinematic hallucination" (11), Powell shifts from psychoanalytical symbol interpretation or ideological content analysis "to focus instead on stylistic properties to ascertain potential for new thought" (73).
Citing reports from survivors of drowning or of drug-induced narcosis, Fechner characterized the experience of near-death as follows: "suddenly a crack opens in the otherwise always sealed door between this and that world (Diesseits und Jenseits) only to quickly close again.