Marsilea

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Related to nardoo: nardoo fern

Marsilea

 

a genus of plants of the family Marsiliaceae of the class Filicineae. They are rhizomatous grasses growing usually in shallow water or wet, marshy areas that occasionaly dry up. Numerous roots grow below the rhizome, and two rows of leaves form on top. The young leaves are spirally convolute; the more developed leaves have four approximate pinnae on a long stem. There are between 60 and 70 species found throughout the world, particularly in Australia and southern Africa. Three species are found in the USSR, growing in the Lower Volga Region, the Caucasus, and Middle Asia. The most common is the clover fern Marsilea quadrifolia.

REFERENCE

Takhtadzhyan, A. L. Vysshie rasteniia, vol. 1. Moscow-Leningrad, 1956.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, the formation of the well-drained Nardoo soils is favoured by runoff associated with steep slopes, and higher evapotranspiration associated with sunny aspects.
The morphology of Mahinerangi soils is transitional between the perch-gleyed Glendhu soils and the well-drained Nardoo soils.
The Nardoo soils have thinner, browner topsoils than the Glendhu soils.
The Nardoo profile (E), occurring on a steep slope with greater runoff and rejuvenation by mixing of soil material by down-slope movement, has evidence of lower intensity of leaching (higher pH and lower KCl-extractable aluminium).
Hewitt (1982) mapped Mahinerangi, Waipori, and Nardoo soils on surrounding land to the north and east of the study area.