bleeding

(redirected from nasal bleeding)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to nasal bleeding: epistaxis

bleeding

[′blēd·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
The undesirable movement of certain components of a plastic material to the surface of a finished article. Also known as migration.
(engineering)
Natural separation of a liquid from a liquid-solid or semisolid mixture; for example, separation of oil from a stored lubricating grease, or water from freshly poured concrete. Also known as bleedout.
(materials)
The outward penetration of a coloring agent from a substrate through the surface coat of paint.
The movement of grout through a pavement from below a road surfacing material to the outer surface.
(textiles)
Referring to a fabric in which the dye is not fast and therefore comes out when the fabric is wet.

bleeding

1. The upward penetration of a coloring pigment from a substrate through a topcoat of paint.
2. The oozing of grout from below a road-surfacing material to the surface in hot weather.
3. Exudation of one or more components of a sealant, with possible absorption by adjacent porous surfaces.
4. The autogenous flow of mixing water within, or its emergence from, newly placed concrete or mortar; caused by the settlement of the solid materials within the mass or by drainage of mixing water; also called water gain.
5. The diffusion of coloring matter through a coating from the substrate, or the discoloration that arises from such a process.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the 1-week follow-up in our study, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the incidence of nasal bleeding, nasal discharge, vestibulitis, and crust formation.
9) However, it commonly causes a variety of symptoms including facial pain, headache, nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, nasal bleeding, recurrent sinusitis, foul smell, and anosmia.
We report this case to highlight the use of readily available materials to effect adequate tamponade of posterior nasal bleeding and allow for safe transfer.
The maxillary antrostomy healed well, and the patient experienced no further nasal bleeding.
Patient 2, A 65-year-old woman sought evaluation for a 4-month history of recurrent right nasal bleeding and nasal obstruction.
A 32-year-old man was evaluated for a complete right nasal obstruction and intermittent nasal bleeding of several months' duration.
In 1993, a 49-year-old white woman experienced an episode of nasal obstruction, nasal crusts, nasal bleeding, and painless ulcerated oral and vaginal lesions.
He denied any nasal pain, nasal bleeding, or weight loss.
A 63-year-old man came to our institution in July 1995 with a long-standing history of nasal obstruction and a recent onset of left-sided nasal bleeding.