nasal

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nasal

[′nā·zəl]
(anatomy)
Of or pertaining to the nose.
References in periodicals archive ?
She also had a higher pitched, nasally voice that was so comforting, so familiar, so Connie.
Factors linked to higher risk of new HCV infection in gay men Anal sex * Receptive anal sex without condom * Rough sex with rectal bleeding * Frequent receptive fisting without gloves Sex without condoms * Receptive anal sex without condom * Inconsistent condom use Drug use * Methamphetamines during sex * Nasally inhaled drug use * * Nasally inhaled drugs include cocaine, amphetamine, and ketamine
The woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, said that the caller had a nasally northern Asian accent, which led to the arrest of Shakeel Razaq, 23.
The character of The Comedian is actually based on Turkington's alter ego character, Neil Hamburger, who does stand up comedy through a nasally pitched voice while sweating profusely, and throwing out "what" and "why" jokes.
This IDC programme represents the first commercial oral variant of the device, which is already approved and marketed for a nasally delivered product.
Yours truly, fitting snugly into the above category, went along to Rhyl's Pavilion Theatre to join in the nasally inflected, Brummie love-in but left slightly unfulfilled.
Across the country, lawmakers and officials are widening access to naloxone, a prescription drug that can be injected or given nasally to reverse an opioid overdose.
They have no edge,'' the nasally voiced Drescher jokes before a full day of fittings, choreography and rehearsals.
The video shows how medical staff at the naval base restrain a person and insert a feeding tube nasally while the subject resists.
Which is sadly something that can't be said of the uber-opinionated Ms Toksvig, who insists on banging on about hers in that nasally drone at every opportunity Radio 4 provides her - which is a lot.
The banning of smoking on commercial flights had boosted "the risk of nasally detecting even small amounts of intestinal gases" in modern cabins where roughly 50 percent of air is reticulated and improvements in sound-proofing meant passengers were more likely to be able to hear the sulphurous rumblings of others.