native

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native

(of chemical elements, esp metals) found naturally in the elemental form

Native

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A native is a person born in a particular place. In astrology, this term refers to the person for whom a natal chart was cast. In the latter sense, it is a useful, concise term that, in any extended discussion, is preferable to “person for whom this chart was cast” or some such other unwieldy expression. The term native can also refer to someone born under a particular sign, as when one says that she or he is a native of Cancer.

native

[′nād·iv]
(biology)
Grown, produced or originating in a specific region or country.
(geochemistry)
Pertaining to an element found in nature in a nongaseous state.
References in periodicals archive ?
As this stage moved to a close, attempts to figure out what it means to be Indian suddenly seemed to gain momentum and propel participants forward into the next stage, in which a life-changing reconnection to other Indian people and their own Nativeness began.
Lee rehearses and updates Whitman's representation of the national self and thus lodges himself as well as that self not only fully within but also externally to the nation and its domain of nativeness.
Eva Gruber's Humor in Contemporary Native North American Literature: Reimagining Nativeness has something of the feel of an end to an era about it, even as its concluding segments reach beyond, gesturing toward scholarship that most likely defines the coming decade in North American Aboriginal/Indigenous humour studies.
Coverage includes the sociolinguistic contexts of world Englishes, their diffusion and location in world contexts; the functional ranges and domains in which such varieties are actually used across cultures; the creative processes determining the distinctiveness of each major variety; the relationship of linguistic creativity to acculturation in distinct sociocultural contexts; the distinction between genetic and functional nativeness, and its theoretical and practical implications; cross-over between canons and canonicities, and devices used for representing such distinctiveness; and attitude-marking love-hate relationships with the medium and their reflections in language policies and language planning in Anglophone societies.
In this connection, it is interesting to compare the ethno-religious construct of Sephardi identity that developed in southwestern France to early modern Spanish notions of citizenship (vecindad) and nativity or nativeness (naturaleza).
This sort of discussion is very useful because it shows that individuals, families, and communities have all had distinct experiences of Nativeness.
Mallot: I would attribute it to generations of Native peoples having their Nativeness repressed and to them not knowing who they are as Native people.