natterjack


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natterjack

a European toad, Bufo calamita, of sandy regions, having a greyish-brown body marked with reddish warty processes: family Bufonidae
References in periodicals archive ?
In Britain, the natterjack toad (Bufo calamita) is now endangered, partly due to acidification of the ponds in which it breeds.
In Leverkusen-Schlebusch counsel should be prepared as a species conservation compensatory measure on a total area of 4 ha a replacement habitat for the strictly protected natterjack toad.
Volunteers helping Mandy Cartwright, a ranger with Flintshire Council's Coastal Unit (right) maintain the habitat at Gronant and Talacre will also get the chance to see local wildlife such as terns (bottom left) and natterjack toads
AT RISK Cumbria has around half of England's population of the endangered natterjack toad.
Wildlife information officer, Lucy Benyon, said: "It looks like a natterjack toad.
They've gone into battle to preserve the precious inner city wilderness where Dixonians rugby club used to play, but which is now a home for badgers, foxes and even a natterjack toad.
S = success, U = unknown, F = failure, and I = invasive Species Common Name Result Alytes muletensis Mallorcan Midwife Toad S, U Ambystoma tigrinum Tiger Salamander S Bufo baxteri Wyoming Toad S, F Bufo calamita Natterjack Toad S, F Bufo lemur Puerto Rican Crested Toad S, U Bufo marinus Marine Toad S, I Chirixalus romeri Romer's Tree Frog S Dendrobates auratus Green and Black Dart Frog S, I Desmognathus quadramaculatus Black-bellied Salamander S Hyla arborea European Treefrog S, U Litoria raniformis Green and Gold Frog S, U Nectrusmaculosus Mudpuppy S Rana catesbeiana Bullfrog S, I Rana dalmatina Agile Frog S, U Rana Tarahumarae Tarahumara Frog S,U Xenopus laevis (African Clawed Frog S, I Species Authors Alytes muletensis Bloxam, et al.
Elite Racing Club are generous supporters, and one of their former jumpers Natterjack came in February on box rest following a serious tendon injury.
Lady Young said the fall in the numbers of over 30 species, such as the stone curlew, fen ragwort, wart-biter cricket, natterjack toad and dormouse, had now been halted or reversed and the future looked much brighter.