dentition

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dentition,

kind, number, and arrangement of the teethteeth,
hard, calcified structures embedded in the bone of the jaws of vertebrates that perform the primary function of mastication. Humans and most other mammals have a temporary set of teeth, the deciduous, or milk, teeth; in humans, they usually erupt between the 6th and 24th
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 of humans and other animals. During the course of evolution, teeth were derived from bony body scales similar to the placoid scales on the skin of modern sharks. Tooth structures such as those found in humans are restricted to certain vertebrates, i.e., most fish, mammals, and reptiles, and some amphibians. The teeth of sharks, which are primitive vertebrates, consist of simple conelike structures, sometimes with serrated edges and sometimes flattened for crushing shelled prey. In many lower vertebrates the individual teeth are replaced throughout the animal's life; old tooth loss and new tooth growth follow wavelike patterns down the length of jaw and affect alternate teeth at any one time, so that half the teeth in a region are always functional. Fish and reptiles that have teeth have homodont dentition; that is, all teeth are identical. The mammals have heterodont dentition, or teeth of different basic types, including incisors for nipping or cutting, canines for piercing, and premolars and molars for shearing and grinding. Carnivorous animals have relatively small incisors, used for grasping rather than for cutting; long and strong canines; and relatively thin, sharp premolars and molars, used for severing muscle and other tissues. Herbivorous animals have well-developed incisors, used to cut grass and other vegetation; canines that are either smaller than those of carnivores or absent altogether; and broad, flat premolars and molars for grinding food. In some herbivores, the upper canines are absent, so they cut vegetation by the combined action of the tongue and lower incisors. Omnivorous animals such as man have less specialized dentition. Only part of the dentition of mammals is usually replaced; however, the incisors of rodents grow out at the base as fast as they wear down at the tip. Teeth, the hardest structures in the body, have been well preserved as fossils and have played an important role for paleontologists and physical anthropologists in the study of human evolution.

dentition

[den′tish·ən]
(vertebrate zoology)
The arrangement, type, and number of teeth which are variously located in the oral or in the pharyngeal cavities, or in both, in vertebrates.

dentition

1. the arrangement, type, and number of the teeth in a particular species. Man has a primary dentition of deciduous teeth and a secondary dentition of permanent teeth
2. teething or the time or process of teething
References in periodicals archive ?
What's more, the AAP maintains that implant surgery is not a "no-maintenance" alternative to natural dentition, because even implants require proper oral hygiene to prevent bone loss (peri-implantitis), which recent research has shown to be more prevalent than many dentists and patients realize.
Impact of complete dentures and impaired natural dentition on masticatory performance and food choice in healthy aging men.
Patients generally emphasize on the esthetic excellence in anterior restoration and to satisfy their esthetic needs, Selection of appropriate shade and color matching to the natural dentition is critical.
Destructive forces associated with nonworking side contacts were first observed by Schuyler who concluded that they were traumatic to the natural dentition, causing neuromuscular disturbances, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, accelerated or increased periodontal breakdown and excessive wear.
In the case of LANAP([TM]) treatment, patients benefit from both the advanced capabilities of state-of-the-art lasers and the conservative protocol that favors the preservation of natural dentition.
Hargreaves (1969) (7) in his survey found that in a considerable number of denture fracture cases, it was opposed by natural dentition.
It is approved for single-tooth restorations such as inlays, onlays, veneers and crowns, and is also distinguished not least by the superior comfort it offers to patients, thanks to material properties similar to those of natural dentition.
Many American adults now retain their natural dentition throughout their lives.
Additionally, the newer cements block the discoloring of natural dentition under veneers caused by aging.
Polychromatic approach is favored by the fact that our natural dentition is also polychromatic, with a variable thickness and hence, a varying chroma and translucency of dentin and enamel in different parts of the tooth.
Following the loss of natural dentition the edentulous individual can be faced with a number of problems associated with wearing complete dentures.
Patient demand is also higher for an exact replication of their restoration to their natural dentition especially if it is a single unit restoration.