negative mirror

negative mirror

[′neg·əd·iv ′mir·ər]
(optics)
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References in periodicals archive ?
In a 1942 novel Mao Dun tells the story of the revenge of Samson against the femme fatale Delilah, where the Philistines symbolize the Japanese; Xiang Peiliang in Annen (1926), a one-act play, turns the love of Amnon for Tamar into a sexual aberration; the writer Gu Cheng, personally obsessed by the death of Christ, writes the novel Ying'er, then becomes insane, killing his wife and hanging himself in 1993; Wang Duqing understands Jesus as an illegitimate son, displaying in a poem on the Virgin Mary (1925) some decadent tendencies; Wang Meng, minister of culture before Tiananmen, takes inspiration from the Apocalypse, describing in The Cross (1988) how the fourth animal, Christ's negative mirror, brings destruction into the world.
A decade, virtually to the day, since "Treasure Houses of Britain" - a lavish celebration of the "country house experience" - opened at Washington's National Gallery, its negative mirror image went up at Minneapolis' Walker Art Center.
Eliot, and Akhmatova; metaphysical implications of exile, as in the case of Mandelstam and Tsvetaeva; analogies that point to certain paradigmatic affinities, as regards Auden; Brodsky's Jewishness as contrasted to Mandelstam's and Pasternak's; Nabokov's bilingual poetry and prose as a measure of Brodsky's poetics; the negative mirror image of Tsvetaeva found in some aspects of Brodsky's poetics.